Work and Lifelong Learning Resource Base

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Work and Lifelong Learning Resource Base

Materials for Teaching, Research and Policy Making

Principal Investigator: David W. Livingstone
Team Members: M. Raykov, K. Pollock, F. Antonelli

 

Section 1.2 [PDF]

Compendium of Surveys
on Learning and Work

 

 

 

I. Primary Canadian Surveys

 

Adult education and training survey (AETS)

 

The Adult Education and Training Survey provides comprehensive data on participation in adult education and training in Canada. The information gathered by this survey is intended to inform policies related to adult training and education. The survey was administered three times during the 1990s: in 1990, 1992, 1994, and 1998. The most recent survey was administered in 2004.

 

1. Statistics Canada. (2004). Adult education and training survey, 2003 (AETS). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

The Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) is Canada's most comprehensive source of data on individual participation in formal adult education and training. It is the only Canadian survey to collect detailed information about the skill development efforts of the entire adult Canadian population. The AETS provides information about the main subject of training activities, their provider, duration and the sources and types of support for training. Furthermore, the AETS allows for the examination of the socio-economic and demographic profiles of both training participants and non-participants. This survey also identifies barriers faced by individuals who wish to take some form of training but cannot. The AETS was administered four times during the 1990s: in 1990, 1992, 1994 and 1998, as a supplement to the Labour Force Survey (LFS).
 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/aets/2003/ aets2003que.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Canada; Adult Education; Occupational Training; Employee’s Training; Employer-Supported Education; Vocational Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Level; Postsecondary Education; Education; Age; Sex; Statistics Databases.

 

2. Statistics Canada. (1993). Adult education and training survey, 1994. Questionnaire. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            This survey was conducted for Human Resources Development Canada. The information from this survey is intended to help form policies to better meet current training needs by asking such questions as "At any time during 1993, did you receive any training or education including courses, private lessons, correspondence courses, workshops, apprenticeship training, arts, crafts, recreation courses, or any other training or education?" etc.

 

URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/cstdli/ aets/1994/aets94que1.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Canada; Adult Education; Occupational Training; Employee’s Training; Employer-Supported Education; Vocational Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Level; Postsecondary Education; Education; Age; Sex; Statistics Databases; Canada.

 

3. Statistics Canada. (1995). Adult education and training survey, 1994. Microdata user's guide. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Special surveys division.

 

            The Adult Education and Training Survey 1994 was conducted by Statistics Canada with the cooperation and support of Human Resources Development Canada. The reference year for this survey was 1993. This manual has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the microdata file of the survey results.

 

URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/cstdli/aets/ 1994/aets94gid1.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Canada; Adult Education; Occupational Training; Employee’s Training; Employer-Supported Education; Vocational Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Level; Postsecondary Education; Education; Age; Sex; Statistics Databases; Canada.

 

4. Statistics Canada. (1997). Adult education and training survey, 1998. Microdata user guide. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Special surveys division.

 

            The Adult Education and Training Survey 1998 was conducted by Statistics Canada with the cooperation and support of Human Resources Development Canada. The reference year for this survey was 1997. This manual has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the microdata file of the survey results.

 

URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/cstdli/aets/ 1998/aets98gid.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Canada; Adult Education; Occupational Training; Employee’s Training; Employer-Supported Education; Vocational Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Level; Postsecondary education; Education; Age; Sex; Statistics Databases; Canada.

 

5. Statistics Canada. (1998). Adult education and training survey, 1998. Questionnaire. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            This survey was conducted for Human Resources Development. The information from this survey is intended to help create policies to better meet current training needs by asking such questions as "At any time during 1997 did you receive any training on education including courses, private lessons, workshops, apprenticeship training, arts, crafts, recreation courses, or any other training or education?" etc.

 

URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/cstdli/aets/ 1998/aets98que.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Canada; Adult Education; Occupational Training; Employee’s Training; Employer-Supported Education; Vocational Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Level; Postsecondary Education; Education; Age; Sex; Statistics Databases.

 

 

Canadian Census

 

The Canadian Census intends to provide a statistical portrait of the country and its inhabitants. The 2001 Census Handbook acts is a reference document, providing an overview of every phase of the census, while the Dictionary provides detailed information. The 2001 data and a wide range of products and services are available on the Internet to users of census data, including analysts, researchers and government decision makers.

 

6. Statistics Canada. (2002). Census handbook, 2001. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Census operations division.

 

            The 2001 Census Handbook is a reference document covering every aspect of the 2001 Census of Population and Census of Agriculture. It provides an overview of every phase of the census, from content determination to data dissemination. It traces the history of the census from the early days of New France to the present. It also contains information about the protection of confidential information in census questions and variables, along with information about data quality and the possible uses of census data. Also covered are census geography and the range of products and services available from the 2001 Census database.

 

URL: http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/home/index.cfm

 

            KEY WORDS: Population Surveys; Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; Agricultural Surveys; Canada; Census, 2001; Handbooks, Manuals; Methodology; Population Statistical Methods; Methodology.

 

7. Statistics Canada. (2002). Census dictionary, 2001. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Census operations division.

 

The 2001 Census Dictionary provides detailed information on all of the concepts, universes, variables and geographic terms of the 2001 Census. The information provided for each variable includes a definition, the associated census question(s), the applicable response categories or classifications and special notes The Census Dictionary also includes supplemental plain language definitions for certain variables, without census or Statistics Canada jargon, to help users better understand the meaning of the definitions.

The Dictionary is divided into five sections. These sections are:

i) Population Universe - Provides information on the characteristics of Canada's population, such as demography, language, mobility, immigration, labour force activity and income.

ii) Family Universe - Pertains to the characteristics of family units. Both census and economic families are included.

iii) Household Universe - Covers the characteristics of a person or a group of persons who occupy a private dwelling.

iv) Dwelling Universe - Describes the characteristics of dwelling units in Canada.

v) Geography - Describes terms related to geographic areas, census cartography and census geographic products and services.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/census2001/dict/appendices/ e_dictionary_2001.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Population Surveys; Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; Agricultural Surveys; Canada; Census, 2001; Handbooks, Manuals; Methodology; Population Statistical Methods; Methodology.

 

8. Statistics Canada (2003). Census: Analysis series. Education in Canada: Raising the standard. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

Canada entered the 21st century with a population better educated than ever, according to new data from the 2001 Census. The hallmark of the 1990s was the tremendous growth in the number of Canadians with a college or university education. The increases in education were dramatically apparent for those in the age group 25 to 34. This generation was in the age range 15 to 24 when the recession of the 1990s hit. Many of them may have opted to stay in school rather than face uncertain prospects in the labour market. This growth has shifted the education profile of the adult population as a whole, that is, of Canadians aged 25 and over.

 

            KEY WORDS: Population Surveys; Employment Surveys; Demographic Surveys; Immigrants; Educational Surveys; Agricultural Surveys; Canada; Census.

 

9. Statistics Canada (2003). 2001 Census: Analysis series. The changing profile of Canada's labour force. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

During the past decade, three key factors have shaped the nation’s workforce: A demand for skills in the face of advancing technologies and the “knowledge based economy”; a working-age population that is increasingly made up of older people; and a growing reliance on immigration as a source of skills and labour force growth. The demand for skills has been clearly evident in new data from the 2001 Census.

 

URL: http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/Products/Analytic/

companion/paid/pdf/ 96F0030XIE2001009.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Population Surveys; Employment Surveys; Demographic Surveys; Immigrants; Educational Surveys; Agricultural Surveys; Canada; Census.

 

10. Statistics Canada (2002). Profile of the Canadian population by age and sex: Canada ages. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

New census data on age and sex show that as of May 15, 2001, the median age of Canada’s population reached an all-time high of 37.6 years, an increase of 2.3 years from 35.3 in 1996. This was the biggest census-to-census increase in a century. Median age is the point where exactly one-half of the population is older, and the other half is younger. The decline in the number of births that occurred since 1991 is a major factor behind both the record-low growth in population between 1996 and 2001, and the record increase in median age.

 

URL:_http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/Products/ Analytic/

companion/age/images/96F0030XIE2001002.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Demographic Surveys; Age; Sex; Population Surveys; Employment Surveys; Immigrants; Educational Surveys; Canada; Census.

 

11. Statistics Canada (2002). Profile of Canadian families and households: Diversification continues. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

A family portrait taken by the census at the outset of the 21st Century shows a continuation of many of the changes in families over the last 20 years. The proportion of “traditional” families—mom, dad and the kids—continues to decline, while families with no children at home are on the increase. Behind this shift in living arrangements are diverse factors, such as lower fertility rates, couples who are delaying having children or who are childless. In addition, life expectancy is increasing, with one result being that couples have more of their lives to spend together as “empty-nesters” after their children have grown up and left home.

 

URL: http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/Products/

Analytic/companion/fam/pdf/ 96F0030XIE2001003.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Demographic Surveys; Age; Sex; Population Surveys; Employment Surveys; Immigrants; Educational Surveys; Canada; Census.

 

 

 

General Social Survey (GSS)

 

The GSS survey program, established in 1985 is a representative national telephone survey which examines a wide array of social issues including education, work, time use, social engagement and family relations in Canada. These surveys also provide data on specific social issues and trends relevant to specific social policy issues.

 

            The two primary objectives of the General Social Survey (GSS) are:

            a) to gather data on social trends in order to monitor changes in the living conditions and wellbeing of Canadians over time; and

            b) to provide immediate information on specific social policy issues of current or emerging interest.

            The GSS program, established in 1985, conducts telephone surveys from a sample selected across the 10 provinces. The GSS is recognized for its regular collection of cross-sectional data that allows for trend analysis, and its capacity to test and develop new concepts that address emerging issues.

            Increased pressure during the past decade, to operate more efficient government funded programmes, has led to a related increase in the information needed for policy formulation, programme development and evaluation. Many of these needs could not be filled through existing data sources or vehicles because of the range or periodicity of the information required. The two primary objectives of the GSS, as stated above, aim at closing these gaps. The GSS is a continuing programme with a single survey cycle conducted almost every year since 1985.

The target population of the GSS consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces. There have been several cycles of the GSS, each dealing with specific content. For example, Cycle 4 covered work and education in the service economy, new technologies and human resources, emerging trends in education and work and knowledge and attitudes to science and technology, whereas Cycle 6 covered self-perceived health status, long and short-term disability measurements, consultations with health professionals, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, sleep patterns, height and weight satisfaction with health, occupational and emotional health measures, job benefits, and old age and disability income. The most recent cycle (Cycle 17, conducted in 2003) deals with social contacts with family, friends and neighbours; involvement in formal organizations, political activities and volunteer work; values and attitudes; the level of trust in people and in public institutions; and the care provided or received on an informal basis.

 

URL: http://dsp-psd.tpsgc.gc.ca/Collection/Statcan/

89F0115X/89F0115XIE2006001.pdf

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Data/Ftp/gss.htm

 

            KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; Canada; Employment; Self-employment; Unemployment; Retirement; Underemployment; Education-Job Match; Occupations; Industries; Handbooks, Survey Methodology; Educational Attainment; Household Income; Social Networks; Social Support; Information Technology; Citizenship.

 

12. Statistics Canada. (1995). General social survey, 1994. Cycle 9: Education, work and retirement. Public use microdata file documentation and user's guide. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            Since the 1993 GSS data for Cycle 9 were collected using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI). With CATI, the survey questions appeared on a computer monitor. The interviewer asked the respondent the questions, and entered the responses into the computer as the interview progressed. Built-in edits and fewer processing steps resulted in better quality data. CATI methodology also eliminated the need for paper and pencil questionnaires. As a result, the forms in Appendix C were produced as reference documents only. In Cycle 9, the CATI system provided the interviewer with two main "components" which can be imagined to represent two paper questionnaires.

 

URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/cstdli/ gss/gss9/c9doce.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Canada; Social Surveys; Employment; Self-employment; Unemployment; Retirement; Underemployment; Education-Job Match; Occupations; Industries; Handbooks; Manuals; Survey Methodology; Educational Attainment; Household Income; Social Networks; Support Educational Attainment.

 

13. Statistics Canada. (1996). General social survey, 1996. Cycle 11: Social and community support. Public use microdata file documentation and user's guide. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The GSS is a continuing program with a single survey cycle each year. To meet the stated objectives, the data collected by the GSS are made up of three components: Classification, Core and Focus. Classification content consists of variables which provide the means of delineating population groups and for use in the analysis of Core and Focus data. Examples of classification variables are age, sex, marital status, language, place of birth, and income. Core content is designed to obtain information which monitors social trends or measures changes in society related to living conditions or well-being.

            Data for Cycle 11 of the GSS were collected monthly from February 1996 to December 1996. An additional sample was added of approximately 1,250 seniors aged 65 and over (sponsored by the Senior's Directorate of Health Canada) and 700 seniors over-sampled from the province of Quebec (sponsored by the Quebec Bureau of Statistics). These interviews were drawn from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) rotate-outs. Approximately 25% of the regular sample was also drawn from the LFS rotate-outs and was restricted to seniors aged 65 and over, thereby obtaining more reliable estimates from this group. Cycle 11 marks the first GSS with social support as the core content. The focus content of Cycle 11 collected information on tobacco use and was sponsored by Health Canada. The objectives and scope of Cycle 11 were: to determine the nature of the help received and provided; to understand the dynamic between an individual's social network and help received and provided; and to identify unmet needs, as well as the reasons these needs exist. As in the 1994 and 1995 General Social Surveys, data for Cycle 11 was collected using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) using Computer-Assisted Survey Execution System software (CASES).

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/sdds/4502.htm

 

            KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; Canada; Time Management; Handbooks; Manuals; Survey Methodology; Educational Attainment; Ethnic Origin; Personal Satisfaction; Religion; Type of Dwelling; Household Income; Children; Lone Parent Families; Self-employment; Occupations; Industries; Job Search; Unemployment; Social Networks; Social Support; Child Care; Community Services; Support Services; Housework; Health; Activity Limitations; Personal Care; Health Care; Educational Attainment; Mother Tongue; Tobacco Use; Income.

 

14. Statistics Canada. (1998). General social survey, 1998. Cycle 12: Time use survey. User guide. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            Cycle 12 of the General Social Survey was the third cycle to return to previous core content: time use. Most of the core content of Cycle 12 repeated Cycles 7 and 2, conducted in 1992 and 1986, respectively. Focus content is aimed at the second survey objective of GSS. This component obtains information on specific policy issues which are of particular interest to certain federal departments or other user groups. In general, focus content is not expected to be repeated on a periodic basis. The focus content for Cycle 12 was participation in sport and cultural activities sponsored by Heritage Canada. Information on media use was also collected for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

 

URL: http://info.library.yorku.ca/depts/lds/docs/gss12/ gssc1298userguide.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; Canada; Time Management; Internet Use; Occupations; Employment; Personal and Family Responsibilities; Hobbies; Housing; Housework; Hours Worked; Hours of Work; Income; Leisure Time; Maintenance and Repairs; Marital Status; Commuting; Courses; Economic Conditions; Educational Attainment; Education; Employment; Entertainment; Ethnic Origin; Survey Methodology; Television Viewing; Time Use; Travel; Type of Work; Unpaid Work; Additions and Renovations; Children; Child Care; Urban Transit; Volunteer Work; Work at Home; Shift Work; Social Activities; Sports.

 

15. Statistics Canada. (2001). General social survey, 2000. Cycle 14: Access to and use of information communication technology: Public use microdata file documentation and user's guide. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            This cycle of the Canadian General Social Survey (GSS) is designed to enable interested users to access and manipulate the microdata file for the fourteenth cycle of the GSS, conducted from January through December 2000. It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey. It also gives a description of how to correctly use the microdata files. The GSS program, established in 1985, conducts telephone surveys across the 10 provinces. The GSS is recognized for its regular collection of cross-sectional data that allows for trend analysis, and its capacity to test and develop new concepts that address emerging issues.
To meet the objectives of the GSS, the data collected is made up of three components: Classification, Core and Focus. Classification content consists of variables used to delineate population groups and for use in the analysis of Core and Focus data. Examples of classification variables are age, sex, education, and income. Core content, such as technology use, is designed to obtain information that monitors social trends or measures changes in society related to living conditions or well-being. Focus content, aimed at the second survey objective of the GSS, is not part of the 2000 GSS because the core content will supply data to inform specific policy issues.

 

URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/cstdli/ gss/gss14/ gssc14gid_v2.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; Canada; Information Technology; Information Superhighway; Internet; Telecommunication; Social Aspects; Economic Aspects.

 

16. Statistics Canada. (2001). General social survey, 2000. Cycle 14: Access to and use of information communication technology. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            Data for Cycle 14 of the GSS was administered in 12 independent monthly samples from January to December 2000. The target sample sizes for each month were initially the same but were adjusted slightly during the year to try to achieve a final overall sample size of 25,000 respondents. These samples were all selected using the random digit dialing (RDD), and, as in previous Cycles, data for Cycle 14 was collected using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI). Cycle 14 of the GSS is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of technology in Canada. Because much of the content on work and education is now being covered by other surveys (particularly the Workplace and Employee Survey) and there is considerable interest in measuring the impact of technology on society, Cycle 14 has a specific focus on computer and Internet use. Examples of the poled content of Cycle 14 include the general use of technology and computers, the work and education background of respondents, and use of computer technology in the workplace.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=get

Survey& SDDS=4505 &lang=en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2

 

            KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; Canada; Information Technology; Information Superhighway; Internet; Telecommunication; Social Aspects; Economic Aspects.

 

 

17. Statistics Canada. (2003). General social survey 2003, Cycle 17: Social engagement: Public use microdata file documentation and user guide. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Housing, Family and Social Statistics Division.

 

Data collection for Cycle 17 began in February 2003 and continued through December 2003. As with previous Cycles, data for Cycle 17 was collected using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI). Cycle 17 of the GSS is the first cycle dedicated to the topic of social engagement, including social participation, civic participation, trust and reciprocity. Data from this cycle complements other Statistics Canada surveys, particularly the National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (NSGVP); the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and National Population Health Survey (NPHS); the Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS); and the Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS).

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/030902/d030902a.htm

URL: http://www.statcan.ca:8096/bsolc/english/ bsolc?catno=89-598-XIE

 

            KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; Canada; Social Engagement; Social Participation; Civic Participation; Trust; Reciprocity; Methodology.

 

 

Labour Force Survey (LFS)

 

18. Statistics Canada. (2006). Guide to the Labour Force Survey. Catalogue no 71-543-GIE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

The Guide to the Labour Force Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, data processing and data quality. It also contains information on products and services, sub-provincial geography descriptions as well as the survey questionnaire.
Employment estimates include detailed breakdowns by demographic characteristics, industry and occupation, job tenure, and usual and actual hours worked. The survey incorporates questions permitting analyses of many topical issues, such as involuntary part-time employment, multiple job-holding, and absence from work. Since January 1997, it also provides monthly information on the wages and union status of employees, as well as the number of employees at their workplace and the temporary or permanent nature of their job.

Unemployment estimates are produced by demographic group, duration of unemployment, and activity before looking for work. Information on industry and occupation, and reason for leaving last job is also available for persons currently unemployed or not in the labour market with recent labour market involvement.

In addition to providing national and provincial estimates, the LFS also releases estimates of labour force status for sub-provincial areas such as Economic Regions and Census Metropolitan Areas.

 

URL : http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/
71-543-GIE/ 71-543-GIE2006001.pdf

 

KEY WORDS: Data Capture; Data Collection; Data Editing; Data Processing; Data Quality; Dictionaries; Handbooks; Industries; Interviews; Labour Force Survey; Provincial Differences; Questionnaires; Sampling and Weighting; Survey Methodology; Survey Sampling; Surveys.

 

19. Statistics Canada. (2006). Improvements in 2006 to the Labour Force Survey (LFS). Catalogue no. 71F0031XIE2006003. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

This paper introduces and explains modifications made to the Labour Force Survey estimates in January 2006. Some of these modifications include changes to the population estimates, improvements to the public and private sector estimates and historical updates to several small Census Agglomerations (CA).

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/bsolc/english/bsolc?catno= 71F0031X2006003

 

KEY WORDS: Demographic Characteristics; Estimation Methods; Labour Force Characteristics; Labour Force Survey; Population Estimates.

 

20. Statistics Canada. (2006). The Canadian Labour Market at a Glance. Catalogue no. 71-222-XWE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

This new online publication provides an overview of a host of labour market topics, illustrated by charts. Among these topics: labour market trends; employment by industry; trends in workplace training; reasons workers select part-time jobs; absenteeism rates; wages and income; international comparisons; labour markets in provinces and census metropolitan areas; and the labour market for immigrants and Aboriginal people.

The first issue of The Canadian Labour Market at a Glance is available from the Statistics Canada website, Our products and services page, under Browse our Internet publications, choose Free, then Labour, then The Canadian Labour Market at a Glance.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/

71-222-XIE/71-222-XIE2006001.pdf

 

KEY WORDS: Aboriginal Peoples; Aging Population; Analytical Products; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Employment; Employment Benefits; Employment Growth; Employment Insurance; Flexible Working Arrangements; Full Time Employment; Hours Worked; Immigrants; Labour Market; Male Female Income Gap; Multiple Jobholders; Occupations; On-the-Job Training; Part-time Employment; Retail Trade; Retirement; Salaries and Wages; Self Employment; Temporary Employment; Type of Work; Unemployment; Unionization Rates; Wage Inequality; Work Arrangements; Work at Home; Working Mothers; Young Adults.

 

21. Statistics Canada. (1998).Methodology of the Canadian Labour Force Survey. Catalogue no. 71-526-XPB. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

The Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a source of monthly estimates of employment and unemployment. Following each decennial census, the LFS has undergone a sample redesign to reflect changes in population characteristics and to respond to changes in the information needs to be satisfied by the survey. The redesign program following the 1991 census culminated with the introduction of a new sample at the beginning of 1995. This report is a reference on the methodological and operational aspects of the LFS, covering stratification, sampling, survey operations, weighting, estimation and data quality.

 

KEY WORDS: Data Capture; Data Collection; Data Editing; Data Processing; Data Quality; Dictionaries; Handbooks; Industries; Interviews; Labour Force Survey; Provincial Differences; Questionnaires; Sampling and Weighting; Survey Methodology; Survey Sampling; Surveys.

 

22. Bowlby, G. (2005). Use of the Canadian labour force survey for collecting additional labour-related information. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

The Canadian Labour Force Survey (CLFS) is a household survey carried out monthly by Statistics Canada. Since its inception in late 19451, the basic objectives of the LFS have been to divide the working-age population into three mutually exclusive classifications - employed, unemployed, and not in the labour force. The CLFS is the “official” source of employment and unemployment data in Canada. Aside from the broad employment and unemployment measures, there is plenty of “other” labour-related information provided by the Canadian Labour Force Survey. This paper has focused on key questions and the concepts upon which they are based. By showing how the CLFS measures industry, occupation, class of worker, hours of work, employee wages, union coverage and job permanency, it is hoped that this information will assist Canadians using our data, as well as members of National Statistical Offices who wish to learn from our experience.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/sdds/document/ 3701_D3_T9_V1_E.pdf

 

KEY WORDS: Labour-related Information; Data Collection; Data Processing; Data Quality; Dictionaries; Handbooks; Industries; Interviews; Labour Force Survey; Survey Methodology; Survey Sampling; Surveys.

 

 

 

New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL)

 

 

The 1998 New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL) survey results provide evidence on the widespread practice of adult informal learning and provide estimates of the amount of time that all Canadians spend in such practice. Empirical estimates of the extent and distribution of self-reported learning activities are provided based on a country-wide representative telephone survey of 1,562 Canadian adults.

 

23. Livingstone, D. W. (1998). First national survey on informal learning (NALL). Toronto: The National Research Network for New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL), Centre for the Study of Education and Work, OISE/UT.

 

            The first Canadian Survey of informal learning examines the extent of adult learning, the existence of social barriers to education courses, and more effective means of linking informal learning with organized education and work. This study is based on a random sample of 1,562 Canadian adults conducted by the Institute for Social Research at York University between August and November, 1998. Nearly everybody (over 90% of the population) is involved in some form of informal learning activities that they can identify as significant. The survey provides estimates of the amount of time that all Canadians - including those who say they do no informal learning at all - are doing in all four areas (employment, community, household, and general interest). The average number of hours devoted to informal learning activities by all Canadian adults over the past year was around 15 hours per week. This is vastly more time than Canadian adults are spending in organized education courses (an average of about 3 hours per week if we include the entire population.) In summary, the majority of Canadian adults are now actively engaged in extensive informal learning, taking further education and training courses and planning to take still more courses.

URL: www.nall.ca.

 

            KEY WORDS: Canada; Informal Learning; Underemployment; Employment; Labor Supply; Educational Attainment; Job Requirements; Effect of Education.

 

24. Livingstone, D. W. (1999). Exploring the icebergs of adult learning: Findings of the first Canadian survey of informal learning practices. Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, 13(2), 49-72.

 

            This paper provides empirical estimates of the extent and distribution of self-reported learning activities in the current Canadian adult population, based on a recent country-wide survey, and briefly addresses some implications of these adult learning patterns. The basic finding from the survey is that most Canadian adults are spending a great deal and increasing amount of time in learning activities, most of this in informal learning on their own. The major implications are that Canada is already and increasingly a knowledge society in any reasonable sense of the term and that Canadian adults' mostly informal learning practices should be taken into account more explicitly when shaping educational, economic and other social policies; adult educators should take this detectable informal learning into greater account to develop more responsive further education opportunities.

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; Canada; Adults; Adult Education; Adult Learning; Educational Trends; Enrollment Trends; Experiential Learning; Foreign Countries; Independent Study; Informal Education; Lifelong Learning; National Surveys; Nonformal Education; Trend Analysis.

 

 

25. Livingstone, D. W. (2000). Exploring the icebergs of adult learning: Findings of the first Canadian survey of informal learning practices. NALL Working Paper No. 10. Toronto: Centre for the Study of Education and Work, OISE/UT. Available at: http://www.nall.ca/.

 

 

            The extent and distribution of self-reported learning activities in the current Canadian adult population was estimated on the basis of data collected during a 1998 telephone survey of a sample of 1,562 Canadian adults. Random digital dialing was used to give all provinces, households, and individuals within households an equal chance of selection. The response rate was 64% of all eligible households. The interviews averaged 32 minutes, and the data was weighted by known population characteristics of age, sex, and educational attainment to ensure profiles representative for Canada as a whole. More than 95% of those interviewed were involved in some form of explicit informal learning activities that they considered significant. On average, respondents devoted approximately 15 hours per week to informal learning (versus the Canadian average of approximately 4 hours per week to organized education courses). The most commonly cited areas of informal learning activities were as follows: computer skills related to employment; communications skills through voluntary community volunteer work; home renovations and cooking skills in household work; and general interest learning about health issues. It was recommended that those shaping Canada's educational, economic, and other social policies give more explicit consideration to Canadian adults' mostly informal learning practices.

 

URL: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/depts/sese/csew/nall/res/ 10exploring.pdf

 

KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; Canada; Adults; Adult Education; Adult Learning; Educational Trends; Enrollment Trends; Experiential Learning; Foreign Countries; Independent Study; Informal Education; Lifelong Learning; National Surveys; Nonformal Education; Trend Analysis.

 

26. Livingstone, D. W. (2000). Researching expanded notions of learning and work and underemployment: Findings of the First Canadian Survey of Informal Learning Practices. International Review of Education, 46(6), 491-514.

 

            This paper analyzes the results of the first countrywide survey of the informal learning practices of adults in Canada, conducted in 1998. The survey found respondents to be devoting unprecedented amounts of time to learning activities, including an average of 15 hours per week in informal learning projects. Implications for policy and program initiatives are included.

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; Canada; Adults; Adult Education; Conference Papers; Continuing Education; Foreign Countries; Informal Education; Lifelong Learning; National Surveys; Nontraditional Education; Underemployment; Unemployment.

 

27. Livingstone, D. W., & Roth, R. (2001). Workers' knowledge: An untapped resource in the labour movement. NALL Working Paper #31. Toronto: NALL Research Network, CSEW. OISE/UT.

 

            This study analyzed the schooling, further adult course participation, and informal learning of organized and unorganized workers in different occupational classes across Canada. Data was obtained from the first Canadian national survey of 1,562 adults' informal learning practices, conducted in 1998, and field notes and interview transcripts drawn from participants in the auto-plant case study of the Working Class Learning Strategies project conducted at five union locales in southern Ontario in 1995-2000. The study found that unionized and non-unionized industrial and service workers in Canada are increasingly highly educated, increasingly participating in adult education courses and devoting substantial amounts of their time to informal learning activities outside organized education and training programs. In addition, the study found that working people are generally engaged collectively and individually in an extensive array of employment-related and other informal learning activities that are neither fully recognized by most employers or union leaders nor given prior learning credit by educational institutions. The study concluded that underestimation of the current range and depth of workers' knowledge and skills by union leaders represents a significant barrier to further growth of the labor movement. Recommendations for strategies to facilitate union growth are suggested, based on what has worked most effectively in these locals of differing general organizational strength and demographic profiles.

URL: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/depts/sese/csew/nall/res/ 31workers.htm

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; Canada; Adults; Academic Achievement; Continuing Education; Developed Nations; Employee Attitudes; Employees; Employer Attitudes; Employer Employee Relationship; Foreign Countries; Independent Study; Informal Education; Job Skills; Labor Force; Nonformal Education; Off the Job Training; Postsecondary Education; Quality of Working Life; Unions; Member Union Relationship; Union Leadership.

 

28. Livingstone, D. (2001). Adults' informal learning: Definitions, findings, gaps and future research. NALL Working Paper No. 21. Toronto: Centre for the Study of Education and Work, OISE/UT. Available at: http://www.nall.ca/.

 

            This paper on adult informal learning is divided into four sections. Section 1 examines different conceptions of informal learning and the issues and limitations associated with alternative definitions of informal learning. Section 2 is a review of empirical research on the estimated extent, role, and outcomes of informal learning and posited linkages between informal and formal methods of learning. It reports that, according to the New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL) 2000 national survey, over 95 percent of Canadian adults are involved in some form of informal learning activities that they identify as significant. Section 3 critically assesses current research approaches to studying informal learning and identifies policy-relevant knowledge gaps concerning the general level and nature of informal learning, the distribution of informal learning across the adult population, the impact of informal learning on individual and firm performance, and the relationship of informal learning to formal skills development. Section 4 recommends optimal approaches to future research on informal learning practices with a particular focus on survey research in Canada and finds it imperative to establish benchmarks of the general incidence, basic contents and modes, and any differential patterns of intentional informal learning and training, and to continue to track trends in relation to other dimensions of adult learning.

 

URL: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/depts/sese/csew/nall/res/ 21adultsifnormallearning.htm

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; Canada; Adults; Adult Education; Adult Learning; Education Work Relationship; Educational Research; Experiential Learning; Foreign Countries; Independent Study; Informal Education; Intentional Learning; Lifelong Learning; National Surveys; Outcomes of Education; Research Methodology; Research Needs.

 

29. Livingstone, D. W. (2001). Basic patterns of work and learning in Canada: Findings of the 1998 NALL Survey of Informal Learning and Related Statistics Canada Surveys. NALL Working Paper No. 33. Toronto: Centre for the Study of Education and Work, OISE/UT. Available at: http://www.nall.ca/.

 

 

            This study provided extensive statistics and documentation of Canadian adults' work and learning activities. The study included statistics for household labor and community volunteer activities as well as paid employment. Learning activities included both formal course work and informal learning, as well as on-the-job training. Data sources were the 1998 National Survey of Learning and Work by the Research Network on New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL); estimates of the extent of unpaid household and community work; the Adult Education and Training Survey; the 1996 census; the National Survey of Giving, Volunteering, and Participating; and the General Social Survey. Findings of the study included the following: (1) in contrast to the concerns about Canadians' need to become "lifelong learners," the study found that most Canadians are already extensively engaged in learning and that the need for higher-level job skills has been greatly exaggerated; (2) in terms of work, Canadian adults are now spending about as much time in unpaid household and community work as they are in paid employment; (3) despite the rhetoric about a "knowledge-based economy," the study found only a gradual upgrading of job skill requirements, and knowledge workers still comprise a small minority of the labor force; (4) as a result of the increased amount of learning by adults and the slower increase of job requirements, many Canadians find themselves underemployed; and (5) instead of focusing efforts on further education and training for Canadians, society and government should address major paid work reforms in order to prevent underemployment from becoming one of the major social problems of the 21st century.

 

URL: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/depts/sese/csew/nall/ res/33working&learning.htm

 

KEY WORDS: Change; Economic Development; Education Work Relationship; Educational Needs; Educational Philosophy; Educational Policy; Employment; Employment Qualifications; Government Role; Housework; Informal Education; Job Skills; Knowledge Level; Labor Needs; Lifelong Learning; National Surveys; On-the-Job Training Participation; Underemployment; Volunteers; Canada.

 

 

30. Livingstone, D. W. (2001). Expanding notions of work and learning: Profiles of latent power. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education (92), 19-30.

 

            Data from Canada's New Approaches to Lifelong Learning Study confirm the pervasiveness of unpaid work and informal learning. Most employed persons engage in a variety of work-related informal learning activities. However, underemployment in terms of the use of acquired skills is widespread.

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; Canada; Adult Education; Education Work Relationship; Foreign Countries; Informal Education; Nonformal Education; Underemployment; Workplace Learning.

 

 

31. Livingstone, D. W. (2002). Working and learning in the information age: A profile of Canadians. Ottawa: Canadian Policy Research Network.

 

            Canadians' employment and working patterns were examined by analyzing the 1998 survey called New Approaches to Lifelong Learning and other recent surveys by Statistics Canada. "Work" was defined as comprising household labor, community volunteer activities, and paid employment, and "learning" was defined as comprising informal learning activities, initial formal schooling, and adult education courses and programs. The data indicated that Canadian adults generally spent as much time in unpaid household and community work as in paid employment. Canadians were extensively involved in learning throughout their lives. According to their self-reports, Canadian adults devoted an average of 15 hours each week to informal learning activities related to their paid employment, household duties, volunteer community work, and other general interests. Those in the labor force averaged 6 hours each week in job-related informal learning pursuits. A generally positive association between the amounts of time people spend in paid employment, household labor, and community work and the time spent in work-related informal learning was found. Employment-related informal learning was more extensive than course-based training across nearly all employment statuses and occupational groups. At least 20% of the employed labor force saw itself as having skill levels exceeding those required by their jobs.

 

URL: http://www.cprn.org/cprn.html

 

            KEY WORDS: Adult Education; Adult Learning; Data Analysis; Definitions; Economic Change; Education Work Relationship; Educational Change; Employment Level; Employment Patterns; Enrollment Trends; Foreign Countries; Housework; Informal Education; Job Skills; Learning Activities; Lifelong Learning; Literature Reviews; National Surveys; Participant Characteristics; Participation; Policy Formation; Postsecondary Education; Public Policy; Time Factors (Learning); Time Management; Trend Analysis; Underemployment; Unemployment; Volunteers.

  

32. Livingstone, D. W., Raykov, M., & Stowe, S. (2001). Interest in, and factors related to participation in adult education and informal learning: The AETS 1991, 1993 and 1997 surveys and the 1998 NALL survey. Ottawa: Applied Research Branch, Human Resources Development Canada.

 

            This report offers an analysis of factors related to adult learning in Canada based on the results of the 1991, 1993 and 1997 Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) of program and course participation and the first national survey of informal learning by the research network for New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL) in 1998. The data documents that, while Canada achieved increasingly high levels of post-secondary schooling, the moderate levels of adults' participation in training activities declined during the 1990s. However, the incidence of informal learning is estimated to have reached an average of about 15 hours a week in 1998. Informal learning is more extensive than formal schooling and not closely related to either level of formal schooling or participation of adults in training activities.
An analysis of the AETS results suggests that perceived material barriers to training participation increased during the 1990s. Among those who were interested in taking training, lower income groups found lack of money to be the main barrier, while higher income groups found lack of time to be the greatest barrier. Further multivariate analyses of background factors and perceived barriers found that income level had a stronger effect on participation rates among interested adults than either age or schooling, and that perceived barriers appear to have much weaker effects than either income or schooling levels. The report ends with suggestions for informal learning measures and more inclusive measures of situational and attitudinal factors in future administrations of the AETS.

 

            KEY WORDS: Adult Education; Interest; Participation; Barriers; Informal Learning; Formal Schooling; Further Education; Surveys.

 


The Changing Nature of Work and
Lifelong Learning, (WALL) Survey

 

 

The WALL Survey was conducted in 2004 with a large representative national sample of the adult Canadian population in order to provide both qualitative and quantitative data on learning and work activities as well as their inter-relations. The survey was administered by the Institute for Social Research at York University and 12 case studies.

 

 

33. Livingstone, D. W. (2002). The changing nature of work and lifelong learning in the new economy: National and case study perspectives. WALL Working Paper No. 1. Toronto: Research Network for the Changing Nature of Work and Lifelong Learning (WALL), CSEW, OISE/UT.

 

            Lifelong learning is now widely assumed to be essential for everyone and has become a guiding principle for policy initiatives ranging from national economic competitiveness to social cohesion and personal fulfillment. But there is a critical absence of direct evidence on the extent, contents and outcomes of lifelong learning in all countries. Effective implementation of lifelong learning policies, such as those envisioned in the Canadian federal government’s current Innovation Strategy (Government of Canada, 2002, pp. 37-48), urgently requires further research on actual existing adult learning. Similarly, the nature of paid employment appears to be changing rapidly in response to global competition, major new technological innovations and labour supply factors. But theorists differ widely over both the extent of workplace changes and their relations with adult learning. Further empirical research on adult learning in relation to the changing nature of work is required to test leading theories as well as to guide economic and educational policy-making.

 

URL: http://wall.oise.utoronto.ca/resources/wallwp01.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Educational Surveys; Canada; Paid Work; Unpaid Work; Changing Nature of Work; Change; Economic Development; Education Work Relationships; Educational Needs; Educational Philosophies; Educational Policies; Employment Qualifications; Government Roles; Housework; Informal Education; Job Skills; Knowledge Levels; Labor Needs; Lifelong Learning; National Surveys; On-the-Job Training; Participation; Employment; Underemployment; Volunteers.

 

 

34. Livingstone, D. W. (2005). Basic findings of the 2004 Canadian learning and work survey. Toronto: Research Network for the Changing Nature of Work and Lifelong Learning, CSEW, OISE/UT.

 

            The WALL Survey was conducted in 2004 with a large representative national sample of the adult (18+) Canadian population (N=9,063) to provide unprecedented quantitative detail on learning and work activities and their inter-relations. This survey is part of the research network on “The Changing Nature of Work and Lifelong Learning” (WALL) funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) as a Collaborative Research Initiative on the New Economy (Project No. 512-2002-1011). The survey was administered by the Institute for Social Research at York University. The network also includes 12 related case studies. For further information see our website: www.wallnetwork.ca. A previous research network, New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL), completed a smaller (N=1,562) related national survey in 1998 (see www.nall.ca). (Over 70 related survey and case study papers are now posted on the NALL site and numerous WALL papers will be posted on the WALL site over the coming few years).

 

URL: http://lifelong.oise.utoronto.ca/papers/ WALLBasicSummJune05.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys, Educational Surveys; Canada; Paid Work; Unpaid Work; Changing Nature of Work; Change; Economic Development; Education Work Relationships; Educational Needs; Educational Philosophies; Educational Policies; Employment Qualifications; Government Roles; Housework; Informal Education; Job Skills; Knowledge Levels; Labor Needs; Lifelong Learning; National Surveys; On-the-job Training; Participation; Employment; Underemployment; Volunteers.

 

 

 

National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY)

 

The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is a longitudinal study which has been conducted in Canada since 1994. The objective of the NLSCY is to monitor the development and well-being of Canada's children as they grow from infancy to adulthood.

 

35. Statistics Canada and HRDC. (1999). National longitudinal survey of children & youth (NLSCY). Overview of survey instruments for 1998-99. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is a long-term study conducted in partnership by Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) and Statistics Canada. The primary objective of the NLSCY is to monitor the development and well-being of Canada's children as they grow from infancy to adulthood. The NLSCY is designed to follow a representative sample of Canadian children, aged newborn to 11 years, into adulthood, with data collection occurring at two-year intervals. The first collection of information (cycle 1) took place in the winter and spring of 1994-95 and the second (cycle 2) in the winter and spring of 1996-97. Collection of cycle 3 began in the fall of 1998 and was carried until June 1999. In addition to the original sample of children, who were aged 2 to 13 years at the time of the second data collection, a new sample of newborn and 1-year-old children was added to cycle 3 to allow for cross-sectional estimates. An extra cross-sectional sample of children 5 years old was also added to allow some provincial estimates for that age group.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/ 89F0078XIE/99003.pdf

KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; Canada; Longitudinal Studies; Health Surveys; Family; Children; Youth; Single Parents; Child Development; Social Conditions.

 

36. Statistics Canada and Human Resources Development Canada. (1999). National longitudinal survey of children & youth Cycle 3 survey instruments 1998-99. Book 2 - Education, 10-11, 12-13, 14-15 year olds. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            This is the second in a set of two documents containing the NLSCY cycle 3 instruments, the various questionnaires used to gather information from parents, children and youth, teachers and principals. This document includes the teacher, principal and youth self-complete questionnaires only; the parent questionnaires can be found in Book 1. The questions used in Cycle 3 are quite similar to those used in Cycle 1 and 2; the reader may also wish to refer to the Cycle 1 and 2 documentation.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/ 89F0077XIE/cyc3-bk2.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; Canada; Longitudinal Studies; Health Surveys; Family; Children; Youth; Single Parents; Child Development; Social Conditions.

 

 

National Survey of Giving, Volunteering

and Participating (NSGVP/CSGVP).

 

 

National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (NSGVP) has been conducted in 1997, 2000 and again in 2004 (CSGVP). The survey is based on a representative sample of Canadians aged 15 and is intended to provide a comprehensive assessment of giving, volunteering and participating proactive in Canada.

 

37. Statistics Canada. (2001). 2000 National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Special Surveys Division.

 

            Each CD-ROM includes a micro-data file and related documentation for the 2000 National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (NSGVP). The survey asks Canadians 15 years of age and over about the ways in which they support one another and their communities through their involvement in giving, volunteering and participating. The survey, given its scale, provides the most comprehensive assessment of giving, volunteering and participating ever undertaken in Canada or, to the best of our knowledge, in the world. The 2000 survey replicates the 1997 survey and enables us to begin to track both changes in contributory behaviours and in the characteristics of those Canadians making contributions. Any trend in these behaviours has important implications for Canadian society.

 

            KEY WORDS: Voluntarism; Charities; Social Participation; Canada; Charitable Donations; Charitable Organizations; Confidentiality; Culture; Data Collection; Data Editing; Data Processing; Data Quality; Donations; Education; Employment; Environment; Estimation Methods; Handbooks; Health; Health Care Institutions; Housing; Interviews; Labour Force Status; Labour Force Survey; Law; Non-response Rate; Occupations; Provincial Differences; Random Rounding; Recreation; Religion; Research; Response Rate; Sampling and Weighting; Social Behaviour; Social Services; Social Surveys; Survey Methodology; Survey Sampling; Surveys; Unemployed Persons; Unemployment; User Guides; Volunteer Work; Volunteers; Volunteer Work.

 

38. Statistics Canada. (2001). Microdata user guide: National survey of giving, volunteering and participating, 2000. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The National Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (NSGVP) is one component of the Voluntary Sector Initiative, a collaborative program of the federal government and the voluntary sector. The 2000 NSGVP was conducted by Statistics Canada in October, November and early December of 2000 on behalf of the Voluntary Sector Initiative and in partnership with federal policy departments and voluntary organizations. This manual has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the microdata file of the survey results.

The content of the 2000 NSGVP and its methodology are, for the most part, identical to that of the 1997 Survey. The 2000 survey is based on a representative sample of 14,724 Canadians aged 15 and over who were asked how they gave money and other resources to individuals and to organizations, volunteered time to help others and to enhance their communities, and participated in the practices of active citizenship. The survey, given its scale, provides the most comprehensive assessment of giving, volunteering and participating ever undertaken in Canada or, to the best of our knowledge, in the world. The 2000 survey replicates the 1997 survey and enables us to begin to track both changes in contributory behaviours and changes in the characteristics of those Canadians making contributions. Any trend in these behaviours has important implications for Canadian society. The results from the survey allow this report to paint a portrait of the ways Canadians contribute to society through their monetary and voluntary support of others.

 

URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/ cstdli/nsgvp/2000/nsgvp00gid.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Canada; Voluntarism; Charities; Social Participation.

 

39. Statistics Canada. (2001). Questionnaire: 2000 national survey of giving, volunteering and participating (NSGVP). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            This survey deals with unpaid volunteer activities, charitable giving and civic participation. The survey results will help build a better understanding of these activities which can in turn be used to develop programs and services to support them.

 

URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/ cstdli/nsgvp/2000/nsgvp00que.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Canada, Voluntarism; Charities; Social Participation.

 

40. Statistics Canada. (2004). Canada survey of giving, volunteering and participating (CSGVP). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The purpose of this survey is to collect data regarding unpaid volunteer activities, charitable giving and participation. The results will help build a better understanding of these activities which can in turn be used to help develop programs and services.
The Canada Survey on Giving, Volunteering and Participating (CSGVP) is the result of a partnership of federal government departments and voluntary sector organizations that includes Imagine Canada, Canadian Heritage, Health Canada, Human Resources and Social Development Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada and Volunteer Canada. This survey is an important source of information on Canadian contributory behaviour, including giving, volunteering and participating.
The objectives of the CSGVP are threefold:

1) to collect national data to fill a void of information about individual contributory behaviours including volunteering, charitable giving and participation;

2) to provide reliable and timely data to the System of National Accounts; and

3) to inform both the public and voluntary sectors in policy and program decisions that relate to the charitable and volunteer sector.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=get Survey&SDDS=4430& lang=en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2

 

            KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Canada, Voluntarism; Charities; Social Participation.

 

 

41. Hall, M., Lasby, D., Gumulka, G., & Tryon, C. (2006). Caring Canadians, involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2004 Canada survey of giving, volunteering and participating. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (CSGVP) offers a unique opportunity to examine a constellation of activities in which millions of people engage, and that are at the heart of Canadian life. Every day in communities across our country, Canadians donate their time and money to charities and other nonprofit organizations, help their neighbours, friends and family, and connect with one another through their community groups.

            This report presents highlights of the findings of the 2004 CSGVP. It reveals the enormous range of giving, volunteering and participating that occurs throughout Canada over the course of a year. Canadians donate money and volunteer time to support the arts, local sports clubs, medical research, food banks, shelters, international relief efforts, and their places of worship, among many other causes. They help their neighbours and friends in a variety of ways, by doing work around their homes, doing shopping or driving people to appointments, or providing health–related or personal care.

            The 2004 CSGVP provides a new way of measuring giving, volunteering and participating. It replaces the way these behaviours were measured in the 1997 and 2000 National Surveys of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (NSGVPs). Because of these changes it is not appropriate to compare results from the 2004 CSGVP with the previous NSGVP surveys.

 

            KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Canada, Voluntarism; Charities; Social Participation.

 

 

 

Survey of Labour Income Dynamics (SLID).

 

 

42. Sauvé, J., & et al. (2001). Survey of labour and income dynamics. Labour interview questionnaire, January 2000. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            Every January, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) Labour interview is conducted using computer-assisted interviewing (CAI). CAI is paperless interviewing. This document is therefore a written approximation of the CAI interview, or the questionnaire. The CAI process is as follows: (a) A question appearing on the computer screen is read aloud to the respondent. (b) The respondent's answer is directly entered by the interviewer. (c) Based on the answer given, and/or age or other flow criterion, the computer determines the next question to be asked and displays it on the screen. This research paper presents the content of the Labour interview, including question wording, possible responses, and flows of questions.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/ 75F0002MIE/75F0002MIE2000015.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Labor Supply; Survey Methodology; Questionnaires; Marital Status; Mother Tongue; Ethnic Origin; Immigrant Status; Household Characteristics; Educational Attainment; Labour Force Status; Employment; Salaries and Wages; Income.

 

 

 

43. Sauvé, J., & et al. (2001). Survey of labour and income dynamics. Income interview questionnaire, May 2000. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            In May 2000 the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics collected data on income for the seventh consecutive year. Respondents had the option of answering the questions on income in an interview, or giving permission to Statistics Canada to allow SLID to use the information from their income tax return. The 2000 Income interview was conducted only for persons aged 16 years or over on January 1, 2000. Cohabitants (new members) identified in the January interview were questioned about their 1999 income (if they were 16 or over). New cohabitants were not identified during the May 2000 interview. They will be identified in the January 2001 Labour interview and questioned in May 2001 about their 2000 income. This research paper presents the content of the Income interview including question wording, possible responses and flows of questions.

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/75F0002MIE/
75F0002MIE2000014.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Labor Supply; Survey Methodology; Questionnaires; Marital Status; Mother Tongue; Ethnic Origin; Immigrant Status; Household Characteristics; Educational Attainment; Labour Force Status; Employment; Salaries and Wages; Income.

 

44. Sauvé, J., Lutz, D., & Hiltz, A. (2001). Survey of labour and income dynamics. Entry exit component for labour interview. January 2000. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            Each January, the Labour interview for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is conducted. Then, in May, SLID income data is collected. Both use computer-assisted interviewing (CAI) for data collection. The questions particular to each interview are preceded by different versions of the Entry Exit component. In Appendix 2, figures 1 and 2 present an overview of the flow of the interview and the flow of the Entry Exit component, respectively.

A new panel of approximately 17,000 households was added to SLID in January 2000, making a total sample of about 33,500 households. Panel 3 was selected from two rotation groups of the Labour Force Survey (LFS) of January 1999. Some information, such as names, sex, date of birth, address and telephone number, was carried over from the LFS. SLID collects marital status and household relationships in a different way than the LFS so in the Demographics module all Panel 3 respondents are asked these questions. For continuing (Panel 2) respondents, marital status is confirmed, but the other questions are asked only if values are missing or if there has been a change in relationships.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/75F0002MIE/ 75F0002MIE2000013.pdf
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/75F0002MIE/ 75F0002MIE2000012.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Labor Supply; Survey Methodology; Questionnaires; Marital Status; Mother Tongue; Ethnic Origin; Immigrant Status; Household Characteristics; Educational Attainment; Labour Force Status; Employment; Salaries and Wages; Income.

 

 

 

Workplace and Employee Survey (WES)

 

This survey, consisting of two components, a workplace survey and a survey of employees within these workplaces, is intended to provide data on the "business of business" by looking at the practices that help firms succeed. This survey examines Canadian employees and employers on a range of workplace concerns including organizational practices, participation in work-related education and overall industrial relations.

 

 

45. Statistics Canada. (1999). Workplace and employee survey. Compendium 1999 data. Catalogue no. 71-585-XIE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            This survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. It provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees (From Introduction).

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/ 71-585-XIE/71-585-XIE99001.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Education Surveys; Canada; Employees; Employers; Employment Training; Hiring; Information and Communication; Technologies; Information Technology; Occupations; Employees; Work Environment; Industrial Organization; Labor Relations; Labor Market; Job Vacancies; Business Administration, Management; Income.

 

46. Statistics Canada. (2001). Workplace and employee survey. Employee Survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            In exactly the same fashion as the "employer" survey, the "employee" version of The Workplace and Employee Survey provides valuable information on the "business of business" by looking at the practices that help firms succeed. It polled Canadian employees and employers on a range of workplace concerns such as "Workforce Characteristics and Job Organization", "Separations" (i.e. the number of employees who have left the organization for various reasons), etc. Survey results provide a unique insight into the relationship between employment practices and firms' performance, as well as more in-depth information on the effect of technology, training and human resource practices.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/concepts/2001wes1.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Education Surveys; Canada; Employees; Employers; Employment Training; Hiring; Information and Communication; Technologies; Information Technology; Occupations; Employees; Work Environment; Industrial Organization; Labor Relations; Labor Market; Job Vacancies; Business Administration; Management; Economic Aspects; Income.

 

 

47. Statistics Canada. (2002). Workplace and employee survey. Employer Survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The Workplace and Employee Survey provides valuable information on the "business of business" by looking at the practices that help firms succeed. It polled Canadian employees and employers on a range of workplace concerns such as "Determine end of previous job and current labour market status", "New employer content", etc. Survey results provide a unique insight into the relationship between employment practices and firms' performance, as well as more in-depth information on the effect of technology, training and human resource practices.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/concepts/2002wes2.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Education Surveys; Canada; Employees; Employers; Employment Training; Hiring; Information and Communication; Technologies; Information Technology; Occupations; Employees; Work Environment; Industrial Organization; Labor Relations; Labor Market; Job Vacancies; Business Administration; Management; Economic Aspects; Income.

 

48. Statistics Canada. (2003). Guide to the analysis of the workplace and employee survey. Catalogue no.: 71-221-GIE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

The Workplace and Employee Survey Guide contains a dictionary of concepts and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, data processing and data quality. It also contains helpful information for researchers wishing to use the microdata.

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/
 71-221-GIE/71-221-GIE2005001.pdf

KEY WORDS: Data Analysis; Data Collection; Handbooks; Response Rate; Survey Sampling; Workplace.

 

49. Statistics Canada. (1998). The evolving workplace: Findings from the pilot workplace and employee survey. Catalogue no.:71-583-XPE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

This overview report provides the first data from a new pilot survey recently conducted by Statistics Canada for Human Resources Development Canada. This survey, called the "Workplace and Employee Survey" (WES) and developed jointly by the two agencies represents the first attempt in Canada at conducting a large-scale linked employer-employee survey. The survey consists of two components: (1) an establishment survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in the establishment; and (2) a survey of workers within these same establishments to obtain data on their wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, other characteristics, use of technologies, and training taken. This data source provides, for the first time in Canada, detailed linked micro-data on establishments and their workers.

KEY WORDS: Downsizing; High Technology; Human Capital; Organizational Change; Training; Workplace.

 

50. Therrien, P. & Léonard, A. (2003). The evolving workplace: Empowering employees: A route to innovation. The Evolving Workplace Series. Catalogue no. 71-584-MIE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

This document provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees. [This study shows that] HRM practices play a positive and significant role in the innovation performance. This relationship holds when dealing with all industrial sectors as well as with the manufacturing sector only. Moreover, using more HRM practices makes the relationship with innovation stronger. For instance, the predicted probability of being a first-to-the-market innovator is 35% when using more than six HRM practices, 11% when using three or fewer practices, and only 4% if none of these HRM practices are adopted.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/downpub/ listpub.cgi?catno=71-584-MIE2003008

 

KEY WORDS: Labour; Information and Communications Technology; Innovation; Technology; Workplace.

 

 

51. Ernest B. Akyeampong, E. B. (2005). Collective bargaining priorities. Perspectives on Labour and Income, 6(8), 5-10.

 

Certain provisions such as pay, leave and supplementary medical coverage are common to virtually all collective agreements. Others such as a cost-of-living allowance reflect the socioeconomic climate of the times. From a list of 10 collective bargaining provisions, employers in the Workplace and Employee Survey were asked the ones included in their settlements. The two most common in 2001 dealt with job security and occupational health and safety.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/75-001-XIE/1080575-001-XIE.pdf

 

KEY WORDS: Labour; Unionization and Industrial Relations; Analytical Products, Collective Agreements; Economic Conditions; Economic Indicators; Employees; Employment Equity; Job Security; Occupational Health; On-the-Job Training; Outsourcing; Salaries and Wages; Socioeconomic Profiles; Unions.

 

 

Youth in Transition Survey (YITS)

 

The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions among Canadian youth. It is intended to be a vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. The first YITS survey was conducted in 1999, the second survey cycle took place in 2001 and the third cycle of the YITS in 2003.

 

 

52. Bowlby, J. W., & McMullen, K. (2002). At a crossroads: First results for the 18 to 20-year-old cohort of the youth in transition survey. Statistics Canada and human resources development Canada. Catalogue no.: RH64-12/2002E-IN. Hull: Statistics Canada and Human Resources Development Canada.

 

            This report provides a descriptive overview of the first results from the 2000 Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 18-20-year-olds in Canada. These early results draw a picture of where youth stand in terms of both their educational participation and attainment and their labour market participation as of December 1999. Youth at this age are in transition - some are in the final stages of completing high school, others are continuing their education at the post-secondary level, while still others have left the school system altogether. Most leave after graduation, while some have left school before completing their program, or using the more common term employed in this report, have "dropped out" of school. Youth in this age group also exhibit different levels of attachment to the labour market, with some combining work and school and others being full labour market participants.
Given variable pathways, a survey such as the YITS that tracks the progress of youth is a key instrument for identifying the factors that can assist youth in the successful pursuit of their education and employment goals. The second cycle of the YITS, scheduled for early 2002, will collect new information from this same group of youth, tracking their educational and labour market activities over time.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/ 81-591-XIE/81-591-XIE00001.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Education Surveys; Canada; OECD; Educational Planning; Career Education; Vocational Education; Longitudinal Studies; School-to-Work Transition; Public Schools; High School Graduates; Academic Achievement; Vocational Education; Employment; Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA).

 

53. Statistics Canada. (2000). Youth in transition survey: Project overview. Catalogue no. 81-588-XIE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada and Human Resources Development Canada.

 

            The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions, as well as support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

The objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions also include family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences. The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages 18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/81-588-XIE/81-588-XIE.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Canada; School-to-Work Transition; Occupational Training; Employee’s Training; Vocational Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Level; Postsecondary Education.

 

 

54. Statistics Canada. (2000). Youth in transition survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 includes information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design permits analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=get Survey&SDDS =4435& lang=en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Canada; School-to-Work Transition; Occupational Training; Employee’s Training; Vocational Education; Educational Attainment; Educational Level; Postsecondary Education.

 

 

II. Other Canadian Surveys

 

The following collection of surveys includes:

 

  • the Household Internet Use Survey (intended to provide information on the use of computers for communication purposes),

  • the Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey (ICTSS) (designed to collect data on the infrastructure, reach and use of information and communications technologies in all elementary and secondary schools in Canada),

  • the Canadian Out-of-Employment Panel Survey (which interviewed people who had a job interruption during two periods in 1995),

  • the 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) (a post-censal survey of adults with disabilities),

  • the 2002 Public Service Employee Opinion Survey (PSES) (which seeks employee opinion on a variety of issues related to organizational effectiveness, workplace well-being and service delivery),

  • the Survey of 1995 Graduates Who Moved to the United States (SGMUS) (intended to collect information on postsecondary graduates who moved to the United States), and

  • the Survey of Work Arrangements (intended to provide information on such things as work schedules, flextime and home-based work.)

 

 

55. Statistics Canada. (2003). Household internet use survey. Ottawa: Special Surveys Division, Statistics Canada.

 

            The Household Internet Use Survey is being conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Industry Canada. The information from this survey will assist the Science and Technology Redesign Project at Statistics Canada to fulfill a three-year contractual agreement between them and the Telecommunications and Policy Branch of Industry Canada. The Household Internet Use Survey is a voluntary survey. It will provide information on the use of computers for communication purposes, and households' access and use of the Internet from home.
The objective of this survey is to measure the demand for telecommunications services by Canadian households. To assess the demand, the authors measure the frequency and intensity of use of the internet. This was done by asking questions relating to the accessibility of the internet to Canadian households both at home, the workplace and a number of other locations. The information collected will be used to update and expand upon previous studies done by Statistics Canada on the topic of the Information Highway. Among other things, the 2003 survey results showed that after surging during the late 1990s, the growth in Internet use among Canadian households has levelled off. However, growth rates remained relatively stable largely because the majority of households were already plugged in, an estimated 7.9 million (64%) of the 12.3 million Canadian households had at least one member who used the Internet regularly in 2003, either from home, work, school, a public library or another location.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/ hius/2003/hius2003gid.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Internet; Households; Information Highway; Survey Methodology; Computers; Personal Computers; Internet Use.

 

56. Statistics Canada. (2004). Information and communications technologies in schools survey (ICTSS). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

The Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey (ICTSS) collects data on the infrastructure, reach and some usage patterns of information and communications technologies in all elementary and secondary schools in Canada. The main purpose of this survey is to obtain critical benchmark data on the integration of ICT in education. The Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey (ICTSS) collects data on the infrastructure, reach and use of information and communications technologies in all elementary and secondary schools in Canada.

The survey was sponsored by Industry Canada's SchoolNet program which works with Canadian learning partners to increase access to and integration of ICT into the learning environment in order to develop an ICT-skilled population, capable of participating in the knowledge economy. Support to the initiative has been provided by the Library and Archives Canada. The survey asked a variety of questions about the reach, use, infrastructure and outcomes of ICT being used in schools. The main topics include: 

  • the current ICT infrastructure in the school;

  • information about the time when students can access computers;

  • information about the location of computers in the school;

  • the types of internet and intranet connections;

  • teacher skills and training in ICT;

  • capabilities in regards to online courses and videoconferencing;

  • attitudes toward ICT;

  • challenges encountered in using ICT.

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=get Survey&SDDS= 5051& lang=en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2

 

KEY WORDS: Information and Communications Technologies; Public Education; Elementary Schools; Secondary Schools: Surveys; Canada.

 

 

57. Statistics Canada. (1995). Canadian out-of-employment panel survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The Canadian Out-of-Employment Panel Survey was conducted by Statistics Canada for Human Resources Development Canada, Strategic Evaluation and Monitoring. This survey interviewed people who had a job interruption during one of the two reference periods: (1) Jan. 29-Mar. 11, 1995; or (2) Apr. 23-June 3, 1995.

The survey gathered information on subsequent employment during a 13-month period, background demographics on the individual and the household, as well as information on job search activities and outcomes, income, assets and debts, expenditures, and training. The survey collects information on employment history during an 18-month period, background demographics on the individual and the household, as well as information on job search activities and outcomes, income, assets and debts, expenditures, and training. The main changes to the sample design compared to COEP 1995 are as follows: all individuals who are issued an ROE in the reference period are included in the 1996 design whereas under the 1995 design, only individuals whose ROE was issued for particular reasons were included; and the reference periods for the 1996 design are consecutive quarters, giving complete coverage across time whereas for the 1995 design, two discrete time periods were selected. As well, information is collected about all employers the individual worked for during the reference period whereas under the 1995 design, information was only collected for the ROE employer, the next employer and the current employer.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Data/Ftp/ coep.htm

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/coep/1995/ coep95gid1.pdf

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/coep/1995/ coep95que1w1.pdf

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/coep/1995/ coep95que2w1.pdf
URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/coep/1995/ coep95cbk1.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Canada; Employment; Unemployment.

 

 

58. Statistics Canada. (2001). Participation and activity limitation survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults with disabilities, including any person whose everyday activities are limited because of a physical condition or health problem.

The survey covers themes such as activity limitations, help with everyday activities, education, employment status, social participation and economic characteristics. Data collected by the survey will be used to plan the services and programs required by persons with disabilities to participate fully in our society. The most recent data collected on persons with disabilities before PALS is from the 1991 Health and Activity Limitation Survey (HALS). In order to better identify the PALS target population, major changes were made to the structure of the sample and the filter questions identifying persons with disabilities. Therefore, comparisons between the 1986 and 1991 HALS and 2001 PALS surveys are not possible. On the other hand, these filter questions can now serve as a standard for identifying persons with disabilities in other Statistics Canada surveys. The PALS survey population consisted of all persons who reported disabilities in response to the Census questions on activity limitations and who were living in Canada at the time of the Census. Interviews were conducted over the telephone by interviewers completing a paper-and-pencil questionnaire. Interviews by proxy were allowed. In some special cases, face-to-face interviews were conducted. Data collection began in September 2001 and continued until January 2002. The reference period varied depending on the question asked, e.g., the past week, the past six months, the past year or the past five years.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Data/Ftp/pals.htm

 

            KEY WORDS: Household Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Activity Limitations; Survey Methodology; Household Characteristics; Educational Attainment; Labour Force Status; Employment; Salaries and Wages; Income.

 

59. Statistics Canada. (2002). Public service employee opinion survey (PSES). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The fundamental objective of the 2002 Public Service Employee Opinion Survey (PSES) was to seek employee opinion on a variety of issues related to organizational effectiveness, workplace well-being and service delivery. The 2002 PSES was designed to enable departments and agencies to identify areas where the Public Service is doing well and point to other areas where improvement is still needed. In addition to making it possible for new employees to provide their perspectives on the workplace, the survey ensures a measurement capacity between the 1999 and 2002 questionnaires. The survey solicited views of Public Service employees on their work environment and overall job satisfaction. Employees expressed their opinions on their work unit, their communication with their supervisor, skills and career aspirations, client services and labour management relations. General information such as age, gender, years of service and province of work were collected and questions were asked on specific themes such as staffing fairness, official languages, health and safety, harassment and discrimination, and retention issues.

The Public Service Employee Survey (PSES) was administered in May and June of 2002 to all employees in the Public Service for which Treasury Board is the employer. The survey was a census. Each member of the target audience received a paper questionnaire to complete. The survey was anonymous; that is, the respondent's name or other identification was not required on the questionnaire.


URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/pses/
2002/pses2002gid.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Employees Attitudes; Labour Relations; Work Experience; Communication in Personnel Management.

 

 

60. Statistics Canada. (1997). Survey of 1995 graduates who moved to the United States (SGMUS). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The Survey of 1995 Graduates Who Moved to the United States (SGMUS) was commissioned by Human Resources Development Canada (HDRC) and conducted by Statistics Canada. The purpose of this survey was to collect information on the work and education experiences of 1995 postsecondary graduates who were living in the United States in 1997, and the factors that attracted them to the United States.

The target population consisted of graduates of Canadian post-secondary institutions who received their certificate, diploma or degree, or completed their requirements in 1995 and had moved to the United States by the summer of 1997. Excluded were: those who were exclusively American citizens who had been studying in Canada and who had returned home to the U.S.; those who were not living in Canada or in the U.S. at the time of the survey; and graduates who may have moved to the U.S. but returned to Canada before the summer of 1997.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl? Function=get Survey&SDDS =4436& lang=en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Canada; College Graduates; Employment; Business and Education; Labor Mobility; Migration.

 

61. Statistics Canada. (1995). Survey of work arrangements. User's guide. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Special Surveys Division.

 

            The Survey of Work Arrangements was conducted by Statistics Canada in November 1995 with the cooperation and support of Human Resources Development Canada. This manual has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the microdata file of the survey results.The need for information on work arrangements such as work schedules, flextime and home-based work was behind the 1991 Survey of Work Arrangements - the first national survey covering these issues. An interest in changes in work arrangements, as well as a need for data on other aspects of working conditions led to the 1995 Survey of Work Arrangements. Both surveys were conducted as supplements to the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/was/1995/ was95gid.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Social Surveys; Canada; Paid Work; Type of Work; Occupations; Hours of Labor; Flexible Hours of Labor; Shift Systems; Home Labor; Temporary Employment; Labor Market; Self-employment; Employment; Seasonal Employment; Employment Benefits; Income; Self-Employment; Income.

 

62. Statistics Canada. Health Statistics Division. (1995). National Population Health Survey, 1994-95 public use microdata files, Ottawa: Statistics Canada. Health Statistics Division.

 

The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) is designed to collect information related to the health of the Canadian population. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994, and will continue every second year thereafter. The survey will collect not only cross-sectional information, but also data from a panel of individuals at two-year intervals. The target population of the NPHS includes household residents in all provinces, with the principal exclusion of population on Indian Reserves, Canadian Forces Bases and some remote areas in Quebec and Ontario. Separate surveys were conducted to cover the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and the Institutions (long term residents of hospitals and residential care facilities) and will be presented at a later stage. The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) was conducted by Statistics Canada. This manual has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the microdata file of the survey results.

 

KEY WORDS: Public Health; Canada; Statistics; Health Surveys; Health Status Indicators; Medical Data Processing.

 

 

63. Statistics Canada. Health Statistics Division. (1998). National Population Health Survey, 1996-97 Household component public use microdata files. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. Health Statistics Division.

 

            The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) uses the Labour Force Survey sampling frame to draw a sample of approximately 20,000 households. The sample is distributed over four quarterly collection periods. In each household, some limited information is collected from all household members and one person in each household is randomly selected for a more in-depth interview. The questionnaire includes content related to health status, use of health status information includes self-perception of health, a health status index, chronic conditions, and activity restrictions. The use of health services is probed through visits, health care providers, both traditional and non-traditional, and the use of drugs and other medications. Health determinants include smoking, alcohol use, physical activity and a special focus in the second cycle of the survey was access to services with questions on preventive tests and examinations probing for frequency, reasons for use or non-use and barriers encountered. The demographic and economic information includes age, sex, education, ethnicity, household income and labour force status.

 

KEY WORDS: Public Health; Canada; Statistics; Health Surveys; Health Status Indicators; Medical Data Processing.

 

 

 

64. Statistics Canada. (2000). Education indicators in Canada: Report of the pan-Canadian education indicators program 1999. Ottawa: Statistics Canada & Council of Ministers of Education Canada.

 

            Education, at all levels, from pre-primary to postsecondary through to adult education and training, plays a crucial role in the development of individuals and society. An educated work force, capable of using knowledge to generate innovation, is vital to a strong and prosperous economy. Education empowers people to be involved in the issues and debates affecting them and society. Indeed, in the Joint Ministerial Declaration of 1999, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for education and training affirmed that the future of our society depends on informed and educated citizens. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has adopted the principle of lifelong learning to reflect the diversity of education and training that individuals will engage in over their lifetimes. This report provides a comprehensive set of statistical measures, or indicators, describing the education systems in Canada in terms of students, teachers, finances and outcomes. It is the publication of the Canadian Education Statistics Council and was produced by Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, in collaboration with the provinces and territories.

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Indicators; Statistics; Elementary Education; Secondary Education; Postsecondary Education; Canada.

 

65. Statistics Canada. (2006). Education Indicators in Canada: Report of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program. 2005. Ottawa: Statistics Canada & Council of Ministers of Education Canada.

 

            These statistical indicators of education cover various aspects of the elementary, secondary and postsecondary education systems in Canada, such as enrolment, graduation and human resources, as well as financing. Furthermore, the first chapter provides a statistical portrait of the school-age population while the last one shows measures of transitions from secondary to postsecondary education and to the labour market. Labour market outcomes are also included.

The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Canadian Council of Ministers of Education. The report was prepared jointly by the two organizations in collaboration with the provincial and territorial departments and ministries responsible for education and training. It is aimed at policy makers, practitioners and the general public.

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Indicators; Statistics; Elementary Education; Secondary Education; Postsecondary Education; Canada.

 

 

 

 

III. Foreign Surveys

 

European Union Surveys on Learning and Work.

 

 

The following surveys offer a broad examination of the state of work, working conditions and education in the European Union. Studies range from those covering the relationship between education and training level and transition from school to work, to European citizens’ attitudes to, and participation in, adult learning of all kinds.

 

 

66. European Commission. (2000). Analysis of the results of the labour force survey ad hoc module 2000 on transition from education to working life. Brussels: EUROSTAT European Commission.

 

            Young people's unemployment is a subject which has been supplying public debates for about twenty years in the majority of European Union countries. Definite increased risks of unemployment among young people are observed in the majority of countries, accompanying the overall unemployment trend. School-to-work transition is a key issue in Education and Training as well as Employment policies. The relationship between education and training level and the transition, as well as that between initial transition and long-term perspectives on the labour market have been extensively studied. The studies point at this process as crucial for policy-making in Education and Training and Employment. The objectives of this report are twofold:

1) Analysis of the methodological aspects:

i) Comparisons of the different national implementation

ii) Review of the module including propositions for improving the features with the idea of repeating the module in the next few years, as well as developing it with the idea of launching a discussion for a specific survey on those who leave school.

2) Statistical analysis of the data:

i) The results of the module should help to provide relevant material concerning the clarification of the notion of the "drop-out" as embodied in the Employment Guidelines.

ii) The module is also likely to propose new elements aiming at appreciating what a successful transition can be (time to get a first job after end of studies, analysis of current labour market situation by education received)

 

URL:_http://ec.europa.eu/education/programmes/leonardo/old/ leonardoold/stat/trainingst atis/ secondphase/area2_en.html

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; European Union Countries; Young People; Unemployment; School-to-work Transition; Education Policies; Training Policies; Employment Policies; Cost-effectiveness.

 

67. EUROSTAT. (2003). The European Union labour force survey. Luxembourg: EUROSTAT European Commission.

 

            The main statistical objectives of the Labour Force Survey is to divide the population of working age people (15 years and above) into three mutually exclusive and exhaustive groups - persons in employment, unemployed persons and inactive persons - and to provide descriptive and explanatory data on each of these categories. Respondents are assigned to one of these groups on the basis of the most objective information possible obtained through the survey questionnaire, which principally relates to their actual activity within a particular reference week.

The concepts and definitions used in the survey are based on those contained in the Recommendation of the 13th International Conference of Labour Statisticians, convened in 1982 by the International Labour Organisation (hereafter referred as the ‘ILO guidelines’). To further improve comparability within the EU, Commission Regulation (EC) No 1897/2000 gives a more precise definition of unemployment. This definition remains fully compatible with the International Labour Organisation standards. (From Introduction). This survey in 2003 includes data collection in an ad hoc module on lifelong learning.

 

URL: http://forum.europa.eu.int/irc/dsis/employment/info/ data/eu_lfs/F_LFS_CONCEPTS.htm

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Social Surveys; Economic Surveys; European Union; Labor Supply; Vocational Education; Politics and Government; Manpower; Statistics; Methodology.

 

 

68. EUROSTAT. (2003). Labour force survey database: User guide. Luxembourg: EUROSTAT European Commission.

 

            The User guide provides an overview of the variables available in the LFS data sets and, details on their codification. The variable list is divided in three categories: Core variables (as transmitted by the National Statistical Institutes to Eurostat according to the last Commission regulation), Primary derived variables (computed by Eurostat on the basis of the core variables), Secondary derived variables (computed by Eurostat to make the analyses easier across time due to codification changes).

 

URL: http://forum.europa.eu.int/Public/irc/dsis/edtcs/ library?l=/ public/ education_labour /lfs_2003_ahm_lll

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Social Surveys; Economic Surveys; European Union; Labor Supply; Vocational Education; Politics and Government; Manpower; Statistics; Methodology.

 

69. Chisholm, L., Larson, A., & Mossoux, A.-F. (2004). Lifelong learning: Citizens’ views in close-up. Findings from a dedicated Eurobarometer survey. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.

 

            This report presents detailed findings of the 2003 Lifelong Learning Eurobarometer, which covers 15 EU Member States, Iceland and Norway. It focuses on European citizens’ attitudes to and participation in adult learning of all kinds, paying special attention to learning related to work, employment and career but setting this family in an integrated approach to education and training throughout life. This is the first time that comparative information on lifelong learning from citizens’ own standpoint has become available, which makes the data a base reference point for the future studies and analyses. The report focuses on three themes: skills for a knowledge society; the diversity of learning contexts; and the participation in, and motivation for, learning. It also highlights information on a number of topical policy issues: citizens’ opinions on lifelong learning and their willingness to contribute to its financing; guidance and counseling; mobility as a learning tool; foreign languages and IT. The material and analysis in this report therefore enriches the basis for evidence-based policymaking and the effective implementation of lifelong learning in Europe.

 

URL: http://www2.trainingvillage.gr/etv/publication/ download/panorama/4038_en.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Continuing Education; Europe; Public Opinion; Lifelong Learning; Adult Education.

 

 

70. European Communities. (2005). Task force report on adult education survey. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.

 

            Adult education is recognized today as an essential enabler of economic growth and social development within the rapidly evolving knowledge-based society and economy of the European Union. This is particularly so in the context of an ageing labour force and the internationalization of activities. Adult learning is one of the key components of the Lisbon strategy. It is a major factor for the improvement of human capital of citizens after leaving initial education and is therefore a key element of both Employment, and Education and Training policies. Consequently, the EU requires the collection of broader and higher quality statistical data on adult learning, in order to inform policy making, policy monitoring and benchmarking activities at the international and European level. Recent reviews of available data at the national level carried out for Eurostat, confirm that national initiatives, where they exist, are not at this time harmonized at the EU level. Eurostat undertook in 2000, in parallel to the Lisbon Strategy issued by the Council, to operationalise the concepts needed to achieve a harmonization of statistics on lifelong learning. Two task forces (the task force on measuring lifelong learning (2000-2001), later succeeded by the task force on the Adult Education Survey (2002-2004)) were created with the active involvement of EU countries, as well as non-EU countries (Switzerland, Canada) and international organizations (OECD, UNESCO Institute for Statistics, International Labour Office) having experience and interest in the field. The present report is the final contribution of the second task force, whose objectives were to explore the feasibility and the requirements for launching an EU Adult Education Survey. This report has been presented and endorsed by the group of Directors of Social Statistics in September 2004. On this occasion, a large majority of EU member states were in favour of launching a first adult education survey in 2005-2007.

 

            KEY WORDS: Continuing Education; Europe; Public Opinion; Lifelong Learning; Adult Education.

 

 

71. EUROSTAT. (2001). Report of the European task force on measuring lifelong learning. Luxembourg: Statistical office of the European communities.

 

            The Final Report of the Task Force includes a methodological discussion on lifelong learning combining almost all available information at an international level. Experience at the national level has also been taken into account through the participation of national experts in the Task Force. Different proposals were made to improve existing ESS sources and to develop new sources. This report demonstrates that today more information is needed on the way people of all ages learn in formal and non-formal settings but also through informal activities like self-learning. Skills may be acquired in several ways and it is essential to monitor the acquisition, upgrading and renewal of skills - as well as skill erosion. We need to be able to assess the societal outcomes of learning (e.g. citizenship-related outcomes, environment, consumer protection) as well as employment-related and personal outcomes in a wider sense (e.g. basic skills, employability, quality of life, economic well-being, physical and mental health, satisfaction). Notions like motivations, expectations and satisfaction are essential for lifelong learning, while personal investment in time and money is a major issue in the debate. The role and involvement of the different actors of learning provision (educational institutions, enterprises, NGOs, professional bodies, regional and local authorities, state and of course individuals) also need to be clarified.

 

URL: http://www.lebenslangeslernen.at/downloads/ EU_MeasuringOnLLL_0201.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Education Surveys; European Union; Public Opinion; Adult Education; Open Learning; Continuing Education; Vocational Qualifications; Occupational Training; Vocational Education.

 

 

 

European working conditions surveys

 

Carried out every five years since 1990, these surveys provide an overview of working conditions throughout Europe. They also indicate the changes which affect the workforce as well as the quality of work. The most recent survey (2005) included the new Member States and candidate countries .

 

72. Paoli, Pascal (1992). First European Survey on the work environment 1991-1992. Dublin: European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions.

 

The survey presented here was carried out in 1991. It was based on direct interviews with 12,500 workers, both employees and the self-employed, throughout the 12 member states of the European Community. The sample is representative of the distribution of the labour force between sectors, males and females, age groups and by professional status. As social integration moves forward, and as the number of initiatives dealing with the work environment at the Community level increase, more comprehensive and homogeneous data on working conditions in the Community is required. The present survey is a step in this direction.

 

URL: http://www.eurofound.eu.int/pubdocs/ 1992/11/en/1/ef9211en.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Working Conditions; Work Environment; Europe; Labor Laws and Legislation; Employees; European Union Countries; Women; Employment; Quality of Work Life; Survey.

 

 

73. Paoli, Pascal (1997). Second European Survey on Working Conditions in the European Union. Dublin: European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions.

 

The second European survey on working conditions took place in January 1996 and collated the views of the 15,800 workers from all over Europe. Its findings highlight how pollution, noise, stress and musculo-skeletal disorders are among the rising occupational hazards in the EU. The survey underlines a need for a more holistic and multidisciplinary approach to tackle health and safety issues in Europe. Above all it clearly indicates that health issues must be central to the organization’s structure and development.

 

URL: http://www.eurofound.eu.int/pubdocs/ 1997/26/en/1/ef9726en.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Working Conditions; Work Environment; Europe; Labor Laws and Legislation; Employees; European Union Countries; Women; Employment; Quality of Work Life; Survey.

 

74. Paoli, Pascal; Parent-Thirion, Agnès (2003). Working conditions in the acceding and candidate countries. Dublin: European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions.

 

The Foundation carried out its Third European Working Conditions Survey in the 15 Member States of the European Union (EU) in 2000. In 2001, the survey was extended to cover the 12 acceding and candidate countries and the following year the survey included Turkey. Working conditions in the acceding and candidate countries provides the first important benchmark of the situation in all 13 countries. Gauging the status on issues ranging from stress in the workplace to types of employment or working hours, the report attempts to portray a realistic picture of the working environment of these countries as they take this critical step towards an enlarged Europe. An information sheet (EF0375) and a summary (EF0396) on this topic are also available.

 

URL: http://www.eurofound.eu.int/pubdocs/2003/06/ en/1/ef0306en.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Working Conditions; Work Environment; Europe; Labor Laws and Legislation; Employees; European Union Countries; Women; Employment; Quality of Work Life; Survey.

 

75. Paoli, P., & Merllié, D. (2001). Third European survey on working conditions 2000. European foundation for the improvement of living and working conditions. Dublin, Ireland: European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions.

 

            This report presents the main findings of the Third European survey on working conditions. The survey was carried out simultaneously in each of the 15 Member States of the European Union in March 2000. The previous surveys were carried out in 1990/91 and in 1995/96. Hence it is now possible to establish time series (at least for those variables which have remained the same) and the report highlights these time series wherever possible. These surveys aim to provide an overview of the state of working conditions in the European Union, as well as indicating the nature and content of changes affecting the workforce and the quality of work. Since they are of a general nature, obviously they cannot address all the issues in detail. However, they do indicate the need for more detailed research, including qualitative research, on specific issues.

This report is limited to a straightforward presentation of the results. It is planned to carry out more detailed statistical analysis at a later stage and to produce separate reports on specific areas. Some of the issues which will be analyzed in more detail are: gender and work; age and work; employment status; sector profiles; work organization and working conditions; time.

 

URL: http://www.eurofound.ie/publications/files/ EF0121EN.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; European Union Countries; Work Environment; Quality of Work Life; Health.

 

76. European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. (2002). Access to employment for vulnerable groups. Luxembourg: Office for official publications of the European Communities.

 

            Over the last decade, the Foundation has looked extensively at measures for the social and economic integration of vulnerable groups. Research (documented in references throughout this paper), mainly through local case studies, has examined experiences in employment and active labour market measures across the European Union. The studies have focused on different groups - people with disabilities, older workers, minimum income recipients, people from ethnic minorities, long-term unemployed, adults with mental illness, and family careers - each with their particular problems and employment prospects, but, of course, often overlapping categories. Moreover, the same basic strategies to improve access to employment are often common to the different groups. This paper presents findings from the Foundation's studies in order to address some of the challenges of employment insertion strategies and to highlight some of the issues for future policy and practice.

 

URL: http://www.eurofound.ie/publications/files/EF0244EN.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Social Surveys; European Union; Social Policy; Manpower Policy; Discrimination in Employment; Labor Supply; Social Marginality.

 

 

 

Other European Union Surveys on Working Conditions

 

 

77. DARES. (1998). Working Conditions Survey. Paris, FR: Direction de l’Animation de la Recherche, des Études et des Statistiques (DARES) - Ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité.

 

This survey was conducted by the French Direction de l'Animation de la Recherche, des Études et des Statistiques (DARES) - Ministère de l'Emploi et de la Solidarité. The objective was to study working conditions and organization and their evolution during the last two decades. The target population was the active population of all the economic activities, and the sample size was approximately 20000 persons.

This survey is a complement of the INSEE Employment survey. This survey covers only metropolitan France. Only private households are included. The survey also covers part of the population living in collective households and some persons who are counted separately, insofar as they have family ties with ordinary households. The resident population comprises persons living on French territory. The complementary surveys questionnaire is applied to each active working individual in the household. The worker has to answer personally. Subjects considered in the questionnaire include: Design of work stations, exposure to physical agents (noise, radiation, vibration, etc.), physical workload, mental strain, work organization issues.

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Survey; Working Conditions; Exposure; Physical Agents; Noise; Radiation; Vibration; Physical Workload; Mental Strain; Work Organization.

 

78. Jansen, R., & Dostal, W. (1998/1999). Qualification and Course of Employment: Germany BIBB/IAB-survey. Nuernberg: Bundesinstitut fuer Berufsbildung Bonn (BIBB) and Institut fuer Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung der Bundesanstalt fuer Arbeit, Nuernberg (IAB).

 

            This survey was conducted by the Federal Institute for Vocational Training Affairs (BIBB)/Institute for Employment Research (IAB). The stated objective was to assess the working population and their actual working conditions. The population consisted of people with more than nine working-hours/week who must be able to answer the German questionnaire (no translation into foreign languages). Apprentices were not included. The population size was approximately 34 thousand employees. Interviews were conducted face-to-face.

Each one of the four surveys treats a specific topic. 1985/86 treated the effects of computerization and 1991/92 compared the working conditions between East Germany and West Germany after the reunification. All four survey programmers included questions related to occupational risk and occupational demands. Subjects considered in the survey include: occupational safety and health (OSH) management, design of work stations, exposure to physical agents (noise, radiation, vibration, etc.), exposure to chemical agents, exposure to biological agents, safety at the workplace, physical workload, mental strain, work organization issues, social environment (participation and consultation, equal opportunities, violence at work, etc.), occupational and health outcomes.

 

URL: http://info1.za.uni-koeln.de/dbksearch/ SDESC2_eng.asp?no=3379&search = BIBB&search2=&DB=E

 

            KEY WORDS: Work Responsibilities; Working Conditions; Job Stress; Work Changes; Occupations; Education; Further Education; Mobility.

 

79. ISFOL. (2002). Features and quality of work in Italy [Le Caratteristiche e la Qualità del Lavoro in Italia]: Rome: ISFOL - Istituto per lo sviluppo della formazione professionale dei lavoratori.

 

            This survey, conducted by the ISFOL - Istituto per lo sviluppo della formazione, attempts to define features of work and working conditions in Italy. The sample size was approximately 2,000 persons. Interviews were conducted at home.

 

            KEY WORDS: Features of Work; Working Conditions; Atypical Workers.

  

80. Smulders, P. (2002). TNO working situation survey. Hoofddorp, The Netherlands: TNO Work & Employment.

 

            This survey, conducted by TNO Work & Employment was designed to describe the work situation of Dutch workers. The population consisted of people 15-65 years of age, of all the economic activities except: forestry, logging and related service activities; fishing, operation of fish hatcheries and fish farms; service activities incidental to fishing; mining of coal and lignite; extraction of peat; extraction of crude petroleum and natural gas; service activities incidental to oil and gas extraction, excluding surveying; mining of uranium and thorium ores; mining of metal ores; and other mining and quarrying (NACE codes). Interviews were conducted by mail, with a sample size of approximately 4 000. Subjects considered in the questionnaire included: occupational safety and health (OSH) management, design of work stations, exposure to physical agents (noise, radiation, vibration, etc.), exposure to chemical agents, exposure to biological agents, safety at the workplace, physical workload, mental strain, work organization issues, social environment (participation and consultation, equal opportunities, violence at work, etc.), occupational and health outcomes.

 

URL: http://www.tno.nl/kwaliteit_van_leven/publicaties/ tno_work_ situation _survey/ improvement_of_productivity.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Occupational Safety and Health; Management; Design of Work Stations; Exposure to Physical Agents; Noise; Radiation; Vibration; Chemical Agents; Biological Agents; Physical Workload; Mental Strain; Work Organization; Job Security.

 

81. DETEFP. (2000). Survey on workers' working conditions. Lisbon: Departamento de Estatística do Trabalho, Emprego e Formação Profissional.

 

            The increasing need for information concerning working conditions justified the inclusion of complementary data related to the working environment that were not included before, such as: ergonomic conditions, more detailed information about the working station, degree of autonomy, absenteeism levels and opportunities for mobility, among other items gathered in this occasion by means of face-to-face interviews. This survey was conducted by the Departamento de Estatística do Trabalho, Emprego e Formação Profissional (DETEFP) do Ministério do Trabalho e da Solidariedade (MTS). The stated objectives were to characterise labour conditions which may be hazardous to the health and safety of the worker; to identify activity sectors, professional occupations and other target groups most vulnerable to occupational risks; and to improve knowledge of services and equipment for the protection and prevention against occupational risks available at the workplace.
The sample size was 5000 workers. Subjects considered in the questionnaire include: occupational safety and health (OSH) management, exposure to physical agents (noise, radiation, vibration, etc.), exposure to chemical agents, exposure to biological agents, safety at the workplace, occupational and health outcomes. As well as ergonomic conditions, working time, commuting time, social conditions (distance between home and workplace, means of transportation used, holidays given, subsidies earned...), accidents at work and occupational diseases.

 

            KEY WORDS: Occupational Safety and Health; Management; Design of Work Stations; Exposure to Physical Agents; Noise; Radiation; Vibration; Employees Working Conditions; Technical Innovation; Training, Risks Assessment; Health Examinations; Ergonomic Conditions; Working Time; Commuting Time; Social Conditions; Accidents at Work; Occupational Diseases.

 

82. INSHT. (2002). National working conditions survey. Madrid: National Institute of Health and Safety at Work (INSHT).

 

This survey was conducted by the Spanish National Institute for Health and Safety (INSHT). The objectives were to gain knowledge of those work environment factors that are generating illness or discomfort in the Spanish working population; to identify the Spanish worker population's typical working conditions; to understand the current preventive structures; to assess preventive activities based upon research, intervention actions or training acts; and to gain knowledge of the evolution of the Spanish working population labour conditions.

The target population consisted of all companies operating in Spain with more than one worker in all economic activities, except farming and mining sectors. The selection of the workers was at random among the employees considering all present workers in the working centre at that time, including in-house workers and those belonging to other companies such as subcontracts and temporary employment agencies (ETT). The selected workers answered the worker questionnaire. Only one employee was interviewed in companies with less than 250 employees and two were interviewed in companies with more than 250. The resultant sample size was 3419 face to face interviews to employers and 3702 interviews to employees. Subjects included in the questionnaire include: occupational safety and health (OSH) management, design of work stations, exposure to physical agents (noise, radiation, vibration, etc.), exposure to chemical agents, exposure to biological agents, safety at the workplace, physical workload, mental strain, work organisation issues, social environment (participation and consultation, equal opportunities, violence at work, etc.), occupational and health outcomes. As well as employees working conditions, labour conditions (in terms of contractual relationships), technical innovation performed by the companies, (machinery and equipment) OSH activities (training, information about security and health, risks assessment and health examinations).

 

            KEY WORDS: Occupational Safety and Health; Management; Design of Work Stations; Exposure to Physical Agents; Noise; Radiation; Vibration; Employees Working Conditions; Technical Innovation; Training, Risks Assessment; Health Examinations.

 

European Survey on Working Time & Work-life Balance

 

The Foundation undertook its first survey on working time and work-life balance policies in the establishments in the former EU15 and in six new Member States in late 2004 and early 2005. It complements existing Foundation data and research on working time, which has mainly focused on individual workers. The survey aims to find out whether, why and how establishments make use of a variety of working time arrangements. First results were available in December 2005. See the section on time for further information.

 

URL http://www.eurofound.eu.int/areas/worklifebalance/eswt.htm

 

KEY WORDS: Working Time; Work-life Balance; European Union; Work Arrangements; Employment Surveys.

 

 

83. Riedmann, Arnold; Bielenski, Harald; Szczurowska, Teresa; Wagner, Alexandra (2006). Working time and worklife balance in European companies.

 

The Foundation’s Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work–Life Balance 2004–2005 set out to map the use of a variety of working time arrangements in companies, to assess the reasons for their introduction and their impact. This report presents an overview of the survey’s initial findings. It focuses on aspects such as flexible time arrangements in general, overtime, part-time work, nonstandard working hours, childcare leave and other forms of long-term leave, phased and early retirement and company policies to support work-life balance.

URL: http://www.eurofound.eu.int/pubdocs/2006/27 /en/1/ef0627en.pdf

 

KEY WORDS: Working Time; Work-life Balance; European Union; Work Arrangements; Employment Surveys.

 

 

Surveys on Work and Learning in Finland.

 

These surveys are designed to produce statistical data and publications relating to adult education and learning, as well as to provide follow-up information on working conditions and other work related factors. It is hoped that the results could be used in planning and decision-making concerning adult education and learning

 

84. Statistics Finland. (2000). Adult education survey. Helsinki: Statistics Finland.

 

            Statistics Finland has conducted four surveys concerning participation in adult education. The data for the first survey were collected in 1980. The survey has been conducted at five-year intervals since 1990, and the next data collection will take place in 2006. The surveys have been joint projects with the Ministry of Education, which has also provided most of the funding for them. In addition, the 2006 survey is part of a European co-operative project coordinated by the Statistical Office of the European Communities (Eurostat). Adult education surveys study participation in education, as well as learning and skills among the adult population. In addition, they produce data about people’s opinions and experiences of adult education, their willingness and need to participate in it, and obstacles to and preconditions for it. Adult education is described by its organisers, contents, scope and perceived effects. Data on specific, additional topics, such as information technology or foreign language skills and diverse everyday learning environments have also been collected on each survey round. Since the 1990 data collection, the collected information has included large volumes of data describing the working lives and work histories of the adult population. The population of the survey has been the resident adult population of Finland, defined in each survey as all persons aged 18 to 64 and living permanently in Finland. Depending on specific research requirements, the upper age limit of the population has sometimes been raised; for example up to 79 in the 2000 survey. The data from the survey are based on face-to-face interviewing of a sample of approximately 5,000 people. The sample of the 2006 survey will comprise approximately 6,800 persons. The data for the next adult education survey will be collected in 2011, integrated into a corresponding survey concerning studying and learning among the adult population in the Member States of the European Union.

Preliminary data on the survey for 2006 will be available in the first half of 2007. The basic report will be written during 2007.

 

URL: http://tilastokeskus.fi/til/aku/index_en.html

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; European Union Countries; OECD Countries; Adult Education; Higher Education; College Costs; Youth; Young Adults; Attitudes; Education; Employment; Vocational Guidance; Academic Achievement; Continuing Education; Occupational Learning; Experiential Learning; Occupational Training; Socioeconomic Factors.

 

85. Blomqvist, I., & et al. (1995). Participation in adult education and training in Finland. Adult education survey 1995. Helsinki: Statistics Finland.

 

            The 1995 Adult Education Survey reports the following: Half of the population attended adult education in 1995; Women are more active than men; Activity depends on initial education; About 43 per cent of labour force are in work-related adult education; Increasing numbers of wage earners are in employer-sponsored training; Big companies are the most active in staff training; Work-related training brings new job tasks; Almost two in three are interested taking part in further work-related training; Self-improvement and professional development are the primary motives for training; Time pressure in the workplace is the main obstacle to participation in employer-sponsored training; Financial restraints are the main obstacle to education during out-of-work time.

 

URL: http://www.stat.fi/tk/he/aku95b_text_en.html

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Finland; Adult Education; Participation.

 

86. Blomqvist, I., & et al. (2000). Adult education survey 2000. Helsinki: Statistics Finland.

 

            The purpose of the Adult Education Survey 2000 is to produce statistical data and publications relating to adult education and learning, which can be used in planning and decision-making concerning adult education and learning, and which offer a comprehensive and reliable foundation for public discussion. This is the fourth Survey on participation in adult education and training implemented by Statistics Finland.

The Adult Education Survey 2000 is the fourth survey carried out by Statistics Finland on the subject of participation in adult education and training. The previous Adult Education Surveys are from 1980, 1990 and 1995. The surveys were made as joint projects with the Ministry of Education. The target population of the Adult Education Survey 2000 are permanent residents of Finland aged 18 to 79. A total of 5,000 persons were selected for the sample by systematic sampling. The data was collected by face-to-face interviews from February to June 2000. The total number of responses was 3,602. Some of the results of the survey include the facts that: More than half of the population participated in adult education and training; Most of adult education and training was work-related; More than half of employees participated in employer-sponsored training; One fifth of adults studied for other than work-related reasons.

 

URL: http://www.stat.fi/tk/he/aku00_ennakko1_en.html

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; European Union Countries; OECD Countries; Adult Education; Higher Education; College Costs; Youth; Young Adults; Attitudes; Education; Employment; Vocational Guidance; Academic Achievement; Continuing Education; Occupational Learning; Experiential Learning; Occupational Training; Socioeconomic Factors.

 

87. Blomqvist, I., & et al. (2000). Adult education survey 2000: Introduction and questionnaire. Helsinki: Statistics Finland.

 

            The purpose of the Adult Education Survey 2000 was to produce statistical data and publications relating to adult education and learning, which can be used in planning and decision-making concerning adult education and learning, and which offer a comprehensive and reliable foundation for public discussion. This is the fourth Survey on participation in adult education and training implemented by Statistics Finland.

 

URL: http://www.stat.fi/tk/he/aku00_ennakko_lomake_en.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Employment Surveys; European Union Countries; OECD Countries; Adult Education; Higher Education; College Costs; Youth; Young Adults; Attitudes; Education; Employment; Vocational Guidance; Academic Achievement; Continuing Education; Occupational Learning; Experiential Learning; Occupational Training; Socioeconomic Factors.

 

 

88. Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. (2000). Finnish quality of work life surveys. Work and health survey. Helsinki: Finnish Institute of Occupational Health.

 

            This survey was conducted by the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. The stated objectives include: collecting follow up information on working conditions and other work related factors, health, well-being and work ability of the working population, health related lifestyle factors, use of healthcare services, and the functioning of occupational health services. The target population consisted of Finnish speaking people between ages 25-65 years (population of working age). The size of this population was 2 800 861. Interviews were conducted by telephone with a response rate of 56% in 2000.

Subjects considered in the questionnaire included: occupational safety and health (OSH) management, design of work stations, exposure to physical agents (noise, radiation, vibration, etc.), exposure to chemical agents, exposure to biological agents, safety at the workplace, physical workload, mental strain, work organisation issues, social environment (participation and consultation, equal opportunities, violence at work, etc.), and occupational and health outcomes.

 

URL: http://www.occuphealth.fi/

URL: http://www.eurofound.eu.int/publications/ files/EF04111EN.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Health Surveys; European Union Countries; Quality of Life; Socioeconomic Factors.

 

 

 

Surveys on Work and Learning in Sweden.

 

 

The objectives of these surveys include gathering data on both physical and psychological work environment conditions as well as gathering statistics on staff training. The target sample is the working population (employees, self-employed persons and family workers) of all economic activities. Working environment surveys have been carried out in Sweden every two years since 1989.

 

89. Statistics Sweden. (1999). The work environment survey. Stockholm: Statistics Sweden.

 

            Statistics Sweden has conducted continuous surveys on working conditions in Swedish working life since 1989, by questioning a sample of 10000-15000 individuals every second year. Some of the questions were also asked in connection with a survey conducted in 1984. The questions in the 1999 Work Environment Survey were asked as supplementary questions in SCB's Labour Force Surveys (LFS) in October-November 1999, and via questionnaires that were sent to those who had answered the supplementary questions. The data collected in LFS can be used as background information, e.g. to allow separate presentation of data for different groups in working life.

This Statistical Report presents results from the 1999 survey, along with certain results from the earlier surveys. The results for all questions included in the survey are presented both as overall results and for women and men separately, with a breakdown into three age classes. For selected questions, the presentation also follows a relatively detailed classification by occupation and economic activity and a socioeconomic breakdown. The selection of questions was made jointly by SWEA and SCB.

 

URL: http://www.av.se/dokument/statistik/english/ Work_Environment_1999.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Sweden; Work Environment; Working Conditions; Social Aspects; Public Opinion.

 

 

90. Statistics Sweden. (2001). Working environment survey: Swedish Work Environment Authority (SWEA) & Statistics Sweden (SCB).

 

            This survey was conducted by Statistics Sweden (SCB) on behalf of the Swedish Work Environment Authority (SWEA). The objective of the survey is to gather data on both physical and psychological work environment conditions. The target sample is the working population (employees, self-employed persons and family workers) of all the economic activities. The sample size was 12,000. Interviews were conducted by telephone and postal questionnaire.
Subjects considered in the questionnaire include: occupational safety and health (OSH) management, design of work stations, exposure to physical agents (noise, radiation, vibration, etc.), exposure to chemical agents, exposure to biological agents, safety at the workplace, physical workload, mental strain, work organisation issues, social environment (participation and consultation, equal opportunities, violence at work, etc.), occupational and health outcomes.

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Sweden; Work Environment; Working Conditions; Social Aspects; Public Opinion.

 

91. Statistics Sweden. (2003). Staff training statistics. Stockholm/Örebro: Statistics Sweden.

 

Statistics on staff training give information on the further education, competences and utilisation of the workforce and can be seen as belonging to both labour market statistics and education statistics. The statistics measure the scope and content of staff training on a half-yearly and calendar year basis. The survey is carried out as a complementary survey to the Labour Force Survey (AKU). AKU is carried out every month. Supplementary questions on staff training are set twice yearly, in June and in December. The survey in June relates to the first half of the year and the December measurement relates to the second half of the year. AKU covers all registered persons in Sweden, aged between 16 and 64. The sampling frame is the Total Population Register. Questions on staff training are only set to the gainfully employed.

The sample for staff training statistics is approximately 13 000 persons. Data collection is carried out by computer-assisted telephone interviews. The type of staff training measured involves training that the employer or the company has paid for, in part or in total. Costs for staff training are measured using a template method in combination with information on the scope of the staff training and information from Statistics Sweden's wage statistics.

 

URL: http://www.scb.se/templates/Standard____23983.asp

URL: http://www.scb.se/statistik/UF/UF0502/ _dokument/TekniskCVTS.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Sweden; Work Environment; Working Conditions; Social Aspects; Public Opinion.

 

 

92. Wikman, A. (2003). Work environment statistics in Sweden. Dublin: European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions.

 

            Working environment surveys have been carried out in Sweden every two years since 1989. Since 1991, the surveys have included questions on work-related health problems. These surveys are designed to provide information against which reported occupational illnesses and injuries can be compared. This information also helps streamline reporting procedures. Findings reveal that work-related stress is on the increase, particularly in certain occupations.

Statistics sources: The ‘Work environment survey’ has been conducted by the central statistics office, Statistics Sweden (SCB), on a biennial basis since 1989. To date, the results from seven surveys are available, each of which was carried out in a similar manner, focusing on the same issues. Similar material dating from 1984 exists for some issues. For each survey, almost 10,000 people were interviewed. Further details on the methodology of the survey may be found at the end of this report. Another statistical source is the survey of ‘Work-related problems’ carried out annually by Statistics Sweden since 1991. The respondents are asked to state whether they have difficulties coping with normal housework or routine tasks at work. They are asked to describe the type of difficulties experienced and their causes. This survey does not aim for an exhaustive description of what illnesses are caused by work, but draws out certain basic information against which reported occupational diseases and accidents can be compared.

 

URL: http://www.fr.eurofound.eu.int/publications/files/ EF0418EN.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Sweden; Work Environment; Working Conditions; Social Aspects; Public Opinion.

 

 

Surveys on Work and Learning [United Kingdom]

 

The purpose of the NALS surveys is largely to gather information about the characteristics, experiences and attitudes of participants and non-participants to support the development of future policy and practice in adult education and training. The other major UK survey, the Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS) is designed to provide an account of management-employee relations. The NALS surveys have been conducted in 1997, 2000, 2001 and 2002 and the WERS since 1980.

 

 

93. Department for Education and Skills (DfES). (2002). National adult learning survey (NALS). Nottingham: DfES.

 

            In August 1996, the Department for Education and Employment (DIEE) commissioned Social and Community Planning Research (SCPR) to carry out a survey of people's experiences of and attitudes towards learning. The result of this work led to the 1997 National Adult Learning Survey (NALS). There have been several previous studies investigating participation in adult learning, notably the 1996 NIACE study - 'The Learning Divide' - but they tend to have been more limited in their scope than the 1997 NALS. The purpose of NALS is to gather information about the characteristics, experiences and attitudes of learners and non-learners to underpin the development of future policy and practice in adult education and training. In particular, the 1997 NALS aimed to identify the extent to which people were taking part in different types of learning (both vocational and non-vocational), the cost of doing such learning, people's reasons for doing some learning, problems experienced, perceived benefits of learning and barriers towards taking part in learning.

The NALS is a voluntary household survey, face-to-face interviews with up to two adults in each household. The survey unit is the individual. The survey collected information about respondents' involvement in both taught learning and self-directed learning in the past three years, or since leaving continuous full-time education. Start and end dates are recorded, and whether the episode involved more than 10 hours face to face tuition. More detail is collected about the three most recently taught learning episodes. As with NALS 2000 a one-year reference period is also used. The most important objective of NALS is to estimate the number and characteristics of people taking part in learning of a range of different types.

 

URL: http://www.statistics.gov.uk/STATBASE/ Product.asp?vlnk=2466

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Great Britain; Adult Education; Continuing Education; Non-Learners; Qualifications; Income; Educational Experience.

 

 

94. Fitzgerald, R., Taylor, R., & LaValle, I. (2003). National adult learning survey (NALS) 2002. Research report 415. Nottingham: DfES.

 

            The report presents the results from the National Adult Learning Survey (NALS 2002). It was carried out by the National Centre for Social Research on behalf of the Department for Education and Skills (DfES). It is the fourth survey in the NALS series; the previous surveys were carried out in 2001, 2000, and 1997. The NALS series is used by DfES to evaluate the effectiveness of their adult learning policies. It is also used to monitor progress in meeting the National Learning Target for adult participation.

 

URL: http://www.dfes.gov.uk/research/data/ uploadfiles/RR415.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Great Britain; Adult Education; Continuing Education; Non-Learners; Qualifications; Income; Educational Experience.

 

95. DTI. (1998). Workplace employee relations survey, WERS 1998. London: Department of Trade and Industry.

 

            WERS 98 is a national survey of people at work. It follows in the acclaimed footsteps of earlier surveys conducted in 1980, 1984 and 1990. The survey is jointly sponsored by the Department of Trade and Industry, ACAS, the Economic and Social Research Council, and the Policy Studies Institute. Its purpose is to provide an account, for all to use, of management-employee relations. For this reason, the survey is supported by leading organisations like the Confederation of British Industry, the Trades Union Congress, and the Institute of Personnel and Development. For those who are familiar with the WERS series, it will be apparent that there have been several major changes made to the survey. This has come about because the sponsors felt that there had been so much irrevocable change since the late 1970s that a recasting of the questionnaire design and the structure of the survey was called for. A full account of the changes that have been made and the reasons behind these changes, can be found in the paper “A survey in transition”.

URL: http://www.dti.gov.uk/employment/research-evaluation/ wers-98/index.html

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Great Britain; Industrial Relations; Employee Attitude Surveys; Labor Supply; Organizational change; Labor Unions.

 

 

96. DTI. (2004). Workplace employee relations survey, WERS 2004. London: Department of Trade and Industry.

 

The 2004 Workplace Employment Relations Survey (WERS 2004) is a national survey of people at work. The survey is jointly sponsored by the Department of Trade and Industry, the Advisory Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS), the Economic and Social Research Council and the Policy Studies Institute. It follows in the acclaimed footsteps of earlier surveys conducted in 1980, 1984, 1990 and 1998. The purpose of each survey in the series has been to provide large-scale, statistically reliable evidence about a broad range of industrial relations and employment practices across almost every sector of the economy in Great Britain. This evidence is collected with the following objectives in mind: to provide a mapping of employment relations practices in workplaces across Great Britain; to monitor changes in those practices over time; to both inform policy development and permit an informed assessment of the effects of public policy, and, to bring about a greater understanding of employment relations as well as the labour market. To that end, the survey collects information from: managers with responsibility for employment relations or personnel matters; trade union or employee representatives; and employees themselves.

 

URL: http://www.dti.gov.uk/employment/ research-evaluation/ wers-2004/index.html

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Great Britain; Industrial Relations; Employee Attitude Surveys; Labor Supply; Organizational Change; Labor Unions.

 

97. Department of Trade and Industry. (1997). Work-life balance 2000: Employers screen & main questionnaire. Essex: UK Data Archive, University of Essex.

 

            This study was conducted in conjunction with the Institute for Employment Research at the University of Warwick into how much people work, when they work, and where they work. The survey was undertaken for the Department for Education and Employment. It is designed to speak to people in a wide range of workplaces in order to get a full picture of current employment practices.

 

URL: http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/doc/4465/mrdoc/word/ a4465uba.doc

 

            KEY WORDS: Work-life Balance; Work; Hours of Work; Working Conditions.

 

 

98. DfEE. (2000). Work-life balance survey. London: Department for Education and Employment.

 

            In Spring 2000 the UK Government launched its Work-Life Balance Campaign. The campaign aims to raise employers' awareness of the business benefits of introducing policies and practices which help employees obtain a better balance between work and the rest of their lives. The campaign aims to benefit all employees and job seekers, not just those with children or adults to care for. The Baseline Study's aim was to assess the extent to which employers operated work-life balance practices and whether employees felt existing practices met their needs. The current study is based on three questionnaire surveys that directly addressed work-life balance: 1) A representative survey of 2,500 employers with five or more employees at the establishment level (the Employer Survey); 2) Interviews with the head offices of 250 establishments that participated in the Employer Survey (the Head Office Survey); 3) A survey of 7500 persons in employment (the Employee Survey).

The surveys covered Great Britain and interviews were conducted by telephone between April and July 2000. The Employee Survey asked questions about the characteristics of the establishment where the respondent worked. This allows the Employer and Employee surveys to be matched with respect to the characteristics of the establishment. For instance, the reports of employees working in manufacturing establishments with 500 or more employees in the Employee Survey can be matched against the responses of employers with these characteristics in the Employer Survey.

 

URL: http://www.docep.wa.gov.au/LR/LabourRelations/Media/ Work-life_survey.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Great Britain; Industrial Relations; Employee Attitude Surveys; Labor Supply; Organizational Change; Labor Unions.

 

99. National Centre for Social Research (2005). British Social Attitudes Survey. London. NCSR. Retrieved November 30, 2006 from http://www.natcen.ac.uk/  natcen/pages/or_ socialattitudes. htm - bsa

 

The British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey series began in 1983, and has been conducted every year since (excepting 1988 and 1992.) The series is designed to produce annual measures of attitudinal movements which will complement large-scale government surveys such as the General Household Survey and the Labour Force Survey. One of its main purposes is to allow the monitoring of patterns of continuity and change, and the examination of the relative rates at which attitudes, in respect of a range of social issues, change over time. The questionnaire usually has two parts, one administered and one for self-completion. Each year the interview questionnaire contains a number of 'core' questions and cover major topic areas such as labour market participation, the economy, defence, and the welfare state. The majority of these questions are repeated in most years. In addition, a wide range of background and classificatory questions is always included. The remaining part of the questionnaire is devoted to a series of questions (modules) on a range of social, economic, political and moral issues - some asked regularly, others less often.

 

URL: http://www.britsocat.com/

URL: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ ICPSR-STUDY/03900.xml

URL: http://www.natcen.ac.uk/natcen/pages/ or_socialattitudes.htm

 

KEY WORDS: Attitudes; Economic Conditions; Economic Issues; Education; Gender; Government Spending; Health Care; Income; Labor Markets; National Economy; National Identity; Political Parties; Religious Denominations; Social Attitudes; Social Issues; Social Networks; Transportation; Trends; Values; Welfare; Work Environment; Workplaces.

 

 

Surveys on Work and Learning [United States]

 

The National Assessment of Adult Literacy is a standardized, representative assessment of English literacy among American adults age 16 and older.

 

 

100. NCES. (2003). National assessment of adult literacy (NALS) 2003. Washington, DC: Institute of Education Sciences. U.S. Department of Education.

 

            The 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy is a nationally representative assessment of English literacy among American adults age 16 and older. Sponsored by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), NAAL is the nation’s most comprehensive measure of adult literacy since the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS).

In 2003, over 19,000 adults participated in the national and state-level assessments, representing the entire population of U.S. adults who are age 16 and older, most in their homes and some in prisons from the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Approximately 1,200 inmates of federal and state prisons were assessed in order to provide separate estimates of literacy for the incarcerated population. By comparing results from 1992 and 2003, NAAL provides the first indicator in a decade of the nation’s progress in adult literacy. NAAL also provides information on adults’ literacy performance and related background characteristics to researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and the general public.

 

URL: http://nces.ed.gov/NAAL/index.asp?file=About NAAL/ WhatIsNAAL.asp&PageId=2

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; United States; Literacy; Adult Education.

  

101. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2006). The national longitudinal surveys (NLS). Washington, DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, National Longitudinal Survey Program.

 

The National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) are a set of surveys designed to gather information at multiple points in time on the labor market experiences of six groups of men and women. The survey provides information on employment experiences, schooling, family background, social behavior, and other characteristics.

 

URL: http://www.bls.gov/nls/

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; United States; Literacy; Adult Education.

  

102. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2006). NLS handbook, 2005. Washington, DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, National Longitudinal Survey Program.

 

The NLS Handbook provides an introduction to and overall picture of the 7 cohorts that make up the National Longitudinal Surveys: NLSY97, NLSY79 and children, Mature Women, Young Women, Older Men, and Young Men. It is particularly useful for those who are unfamiliar with the surveys and their data. Each cohort-specific chapter of the Handbook is accompanied by detailed tables that provide users with information about many of the variables contained in each of the surveys over time.

 

URL: http://www.bls.gov/nls/handbook/nlshndbk.htm

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; United States; Literacy; Adult Education.

  

103. BLS. (August 25, 2006). Number of jobs held, labor market activity, and earnings growth among the youngest baby boomers: Results from a longitudinal survey. Washington, DC: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, National Longitudinal Survey Program.

 

The average person born in the later years of the baby boom held 10.5 jobs from age 18 to age 40, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor. Nearly three-fifths of these jobs were held from ages 18 to 25.

These findings are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a survey of 9,964 men and women who were ages 14 to 22 when first interviewed in 1979 and ages 39 to 48 when interviewed most recently in 2004-05. These respondents were born in the years 1957 to 1964, the later years of the “baby boom” that occurred in the United States from 1946 to 1964.

 

URL: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/nlsoy.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Educational Surveys; United States; Earning; Labour Market Activity.

  

104. NCES. (2003). National assessment of adult literacy (NALS) 2003. Washington, DC: Institute of Education Sciences. U.S. Department of Education.

 

            The 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy is a nationally representative assessment of English literacy among American adults age 16 and older. Sponsored by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), NAAL is the nation’s most comprehensive measure of adult literacy since the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS).

In 2003, over 19,000 adults participated in the national and state-level assessments, representing the entire population of U.S. adults who are age 16 and older, most in their homes and some in prisons from the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Approximately 1,200 inmates of federal and state prisons were assessed in order to provide separate estimates of literacy for the incarcerated population. By comparing results from 1992 and 2003, NAAL provides the first indicator in a decade of the nation’s progress in adult literacy. NAAL also provides information on adults’ literacy performance and related background characteristics to researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and the general public.

 

URL: http://nces.ed.gov/NAAL/

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; United States; Literacy; Adult Education.

  

105. NCES. (2006). National household education surveys (NHES). Washington, DC: Institute of Education Sciences. U.S. Department of Education.

 

            Description: Three surveys were fielded in 2005 as part of the National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES). These were the Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP), the After-School Programs and Activities (ASPA), and the Adult Education (AE) surveys. Three surveys were also fielded in 2001 as part of NHES. These were earlier versions of the 2005 collections and include the Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Survey (AELL), the Before- and After-School Programs and Activities Survey (ASPA) and the Early Childhood Program Participation Survey (ECPP). The 2003 collections were the Parent and Family Involvement (PFI) and the Adult Education for Work-Related Reasons (AEWR) surveys. The data, data documentation, and software to help search through and convert the data from these surveys into SPSS, SAS, or STATA files are available on CD.

 

URL: http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2006078

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Household Surveys; United States; Adult Education; Adult Learning; Employee’s Training.

 

106. BLS. (2001). The national longitudinal surveys (NLS). Handbook. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. National Longitudinal Surveys.

 

            The National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS), sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), are a set of surveys designed to gather information at multiple points in time on the labor market experiences of six groups of men and women. Each of the six cohorts has been selected to represent all people living in the United States at the initial interview date and born during a given period. This selection allows weighted conclusions to be drawn about the sample group that can be generalized to represent the experiences of the larger population of U.S. residents born during the same period. Sample design procedures ensure that the labor market experiences of blacks, Hispanics, youths, women, and the economically disadvantaged can be examined. The NLS also include surveys of the children born to women who participate in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79). Detailed information is gathered biennially on the child's home environment and cognitive, socioemotional, and physiological development; as they get older, these young adults report on their education, workforce participation, and fertility. This unique set of national surveys offers researchers the opportunity to study large panels of men, women, and children over significant segments of their lives.

Each of the NLS cohorts consists of 5,000 or more original members, some of whom have been surveyed over several decades. Interviews continue with four of the six cohorts, as well as the NLSY79 children and young adults. Table 1.1 summarizes the NLS cohorts, the sizes of the original samples, the span of years over which each group has been interviewed, and the current interview status of each group.

 

URL: http://www.bls.gov/nls/

URL: http://www.bls.gov/nls/handbook/nlshndbk.htm

URL: http://www.columbia.edu/acis/eds/dset_guides/nls.html.

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; Household Surveys; United States; Adult Education; Adult Learning; Employee’s Training.

  

107. BLS. (April 30, 1999). Employment experience and other characteristics of youths: Results from a new longitudinal survey. Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor.

 

            More than half (57 percent) of youths participate in some type of work activity while age 14, and nearly two-thirds (64 percent) work at some point while age 15, according to a new survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor. Work, as defined in the survey, can include "employee" jobs, in which youths have an on-going relationship with a particular employer, such as a restaurant or supermarket, and/or "freelance" jobs outside the home, where the youth is doing tasks such as baby-sitting or yard work. These findings are from the first round of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a nationally representative sample of 9,022 young men and women who were 12 to 16 years of age on December 31, 1996. The survey provides information on employment experiences, schooling, family background, social behavior, and other characteristics.

This release focuses on four aspects of the lives of these youths who were ages 12 to 17 when interviewed in 1997: overall employment, employment while in school, educational experiences, and home characteristics.

 

URL: http://www.bls.gov/nls/nlsy97r1.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Educational Surveys; Household Surveys; United States; Employment.

 

108. BLS. (August 25, 2004). Number of jobs, labor Market experience, and earnings growth: Results from a longitudinal survey [NLSY79 round 17]. Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor.

 

            The average person born in the later years of the baby boom held 10 jobs from age 18 to age 38, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor. More than two-thirds of these jobs were held in the first half of the period, from ages 18 to 27. However, baby boomers continued to have a relatively large number of short-duration jobs even as they approached middle age. These findings are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a survey of 9,964 young men and women who were ages 14 to 22 when first interviewed in 1979 and ages 37 to 45 when interviewed most recently in 2002. These respondents were born in the years 1957 to 1964, the later years of the “baby boom” that occurred in the United States from 1946 to 1964. The survey spans two decades and provides information on work and non-work experiences, training, schooling, income and assets, health conditions, and other characteristics. The information provided by respondents, who were interviewed annually from 1979 to 1994 and biennially since 1994, can be considered representative of all men and women born in the late 1950s and early 1960s and living in the United States when the survey began in 1979.

 

URL: http://www.bls.gov/nls/nlsy79.htm,
http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/nlsoy.pdf

 

KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; Educational Surveys; United States; Earning; Labour Market Activity.

 

109. BLS. (December 7, 2000). Employment experience of youths: Results from a longitudinal survey [NLSY97 round 2]. Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor.

 

            Working while in school is the norm among older high school students. Nearly three out of every five students (58 percent) who were 16 years old when the 1997-98 school year began worked for an employer at some point during the academic year, according to a survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor. These are some of the findings from the second round of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a nationally representative sample of about 9,000 young men and women who were born during the years 1980 to 1984. These respondents were ages 12 to 17 when first interviewed in 1997 and ages 13 to 19 when interviewed a second time in 1998-99. The survey provides information on the employment experiences, schooling, family background, social behavior, and other characteristics of these youths.

This survey focuses on the employment experiences of these youths both during the school year and the summer. The survey divides work into two categories: "employee" jobs, in which youths have an on-going relationship with a particular employer, such as a restaurant or supermarket; and "freelance" jobs, where the youth is doing one or a few tasks for several people but has no "boss." Examples of freelance jobs are babysitting or yard work.

 

URL: http://www.bls.gov/nls/nlsy97r2.pdf

 

KEY WORDS: School-to-Work Transition; Employment Surveys; Educational Surveys; United States; Earning; Labour Market Activity.

 

110. California Work and Health Survey. (2000). The California work and health survey. San Francisco: Department of Medicine, University of California.

 

            Initiated in 1998 by faculty and staff of the Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California, San Francisco, the California Work and Health Survey (CWHS) is a telephone-based, longitudinal survey of California adults. It is conducted by the Field Institute and funded by the California Wellness Foundation.

The survey provides a detailed description of contemporary reality for Californians. It is unique in its extensive coverage of employment status, working conditions, and job loss, and of health status, healthcare access, and health behaviors. The longitudinal design allows for analyses of health outcomes related to one's employment situation, and of employment outcomes for persons with various health conditions.

            Three years of the study have now been completed. The baseline data include 1,771 interviews conducted in June 1998. The 1999 interviews, conducted in May & June, include 913 re-interviews, and 1,131 new baseline interviews. Respondents aged 45 - 70 in 1999 also completed a supplemental interview focusing on health and economic issues related to retirement and work in this age group. In 2000, interviews were conducted in May to July and included 1,265 re-interviews and 903 new baseline interviews.

 

URL: http://www.medicine.ucsf.edu/programs/cwhs

URL: http://ihps.ucsf.edu/arg/work_health_nexus.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Employment Surveys; United States; California; Working Conditions; Stress; Quality of Life; Health.

 

111. NORC (2006). General Social Survey: GSS Study Description. Retrieved November 30, 2006 from NORC, National Organization for Research Chicago, IL: University of Chicago http://www.norc.org/projects/ gensoc1.asp

The United States General Social Survey (GSS), conducted annually between 1972 and 1994 (except for 1979, 1981, and 1992) and biennially thereafter by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, collects information from the general public on a wide variety of subjects, including attitudes toward social issues, religion, education, jobs and the economy, government and other institutions, politics, and policy issues. Many questions are asked either in every survey or at various intervals across time, allowing trends to be analyzed. The 2002 GSS is of particular interest to sociological, educational and job related issues because it includes a battery of questions focused on work and related educational issues. A module, on the work related issues from ISSP includes questions on the working conditions, interpersonal relations and skiils. Another module examines use of the Internet, information and communication technologies.

URL: http://www.norc.org/projects/gensoc1.asp
URL: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04295.xml

URL: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/GSS/

 

KEY WORDS: Citizen Participation; Community Participation; Computer Literacy; Computer Use; Environmental Attitudes; Gender Roles; Government Programs; Health Status; Human Rights; Information Literacy; Life Cycle; Mental Health; Occupational Status; Political Participation; Poverty; Prejudice; Race Relations; Religion; Social Attitudes; Social Control; Social Indicators; Social Inequality; Social Issues; Social Justice; Social Mobility; Socioeconomic Status; Wages and Salaries; Work; Work Attitudes.

 

 

112. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2006). The American Time Use Survey (ATUS). Retrieved November 30, 2006 from Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor http://www.bls.gov/tus

 

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) measures the amount of time people spend doing various activities, such as paid work, childcare, volunteering, and socializing. The American Time Use Survey is the Nation’s first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life’s activities.

In ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were, and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The major purpose of ATUS is to develop nationally representative estimates of how people spend their time. Many ATUS users are interested in the amount of time Americans spend doing unpaid, nonmarket work. These include unpaid childcare and adult care, housework, and volunteering. The survey also provides information on the amount of time people spend in many other activities, such as religious activities, socializing, exercising, and relaxing. In addition to collecting data about what people did on the day before the interview, ATUS collects information about where and with whom each activity occurred, and whether the activities were done for one’s job or business. Demographic information—including sex, race, age, educational attainment, occupation, income, marital status, and the presence of children in the household—also is available for each respondent. Although some of these variables are updated during the ATUS interview, most of this information comes from earlier CPS interviews, as the ATUS sample is drawn from a subset of households that have completed month 8 of the CPS.

 

URL: http://www.bls.gov/tus/atususersguide.pdf

 

KEY WORDS: Family Life; Family-Work Relationship; Housework; Leisure; Lifestyles; Quality of Life; Recreation; Social Interaction; Social Life; Time Utilization; Work; Working Hours.

 

 

VI. International Surveys

 

International Adult Literacy and Lifeskills Surveys
(IALS, ALL/ILSS)

 

These broad, international surveys cover such themes as education outcomes and their effects, and information on adult literacy. This survey provides data for comparison of the national data and international survey results.

 

 

113. Descy, P. & Tessaring, M. (Eds.). (2004). The foundations of evaluation and impact research. Third report on vocational training research in Europe: Background report. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.

 

            The OECD project DeSeCo (Definition and selection of competences: theoretical and conceptual foundations) was undertaken in response to this increasing interest in education outcomes and their effects. DeSeCo developed a common, overarching conceptual frame of reference for identifying and assessing key competences. Key competences are individually based competences considered necessary or desirable for effective participation in democratic societies and for coping with global demands, particularly those related to the so-called knowledge economy or information society.

DeSeCo was initiated in the OECD context at the end of 1997 and carried out under the leadership of the Swiss Federal Statistical Office. It is embedded in OECD’s long-term programme on education indicators (INES) which aims to provide measures on the functioning, development and impact of education. The work of DeSeCo was designed to complement past and current international empirical studies, in particular the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Adult Literacy and Life Skills (ALL) survey. The analysis and reflection in DeSeCo is not restricted to what can be learned and taught in schools or to what is currently or readily measurable in large-scale assessments. DeSeCo has not addressed its task by an inductive method, starting from factual situations, but rather by starting at a more general level, laying out conceptual and theoretical considerations.

DeSeCo’s approach is international, interdisciplinary and policy-oriented. Inputs to DeSeCo have included discipline-oriented academic contributions, commentaries from leading experts working in various fields, as well as country-specific reports. Two international symposia and various expert meetings provided opportunities for gaining interdisciplinary insight and a better understanding of the needs and concerns of policy-makers and experts from education, business, labour, health and other relevant sectors.

 

URL: http://www.trainingvillage.gr/etv/Upload/Projects_ Networks/

ResearchLab/ Research Report/BgR1_Rychen.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Vocational Education; Occupational Training; Research; Evaluation; European Union Countries.

 

 

114. NCES. (2003). The 2003 international adult literacy and lifeskills survey (ALL). Washington, DC: Institute of Education Sciences. U.S. Department of Education.

 

            The 2003 International Adult Literacy and Lifeskills Survey (ALL) consisted of two components: A background questionnaire designed to collect general participant information (such as sex, age, race/ethnicity, education level, and labor force status) and more targeted questions related to literacy practices, familiarity with information and communication technology, education course taking, and health. Trained interviewers administered approximately 45 minutes of background questions and 60 minutes of assessment items to participants in their homes. Sample items can be found online with this Issue Brief and at http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/all. In the United States, a nationally representative sample of 3,420 adults ages 16–65 participated in ALL. Data collection for the United States took place between January and June 2003.

 

URL: http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/all/issuebrief.asp?issuebrief Type=2

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; United States; International Surveys; Literacy; Adult Education.

 

115. Statistics Canada. (1996). International adult literacy survey. 1994-1996. User guide. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, National Literacy Secretariat & Human Resources Development Canada.

 

            The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) was undertaken by thirteen governments and three intergovernmental organizations in a collaborative effort to fill the need for more information on adult literacy. In this survey, large samples of adults (ranging from 1,500 to 6,000 per country) worldwide were given the same broad test of their literacy skills between 1994 and 1996. The results provide the most detailed portrait ever created on the condition of adult literacy and its relationship with an array of background and demographic characteristics. The study's findings were summarized in a report published in December 1995, entitled Literacy, Economy and Society: Results of the first International Adult Literacy Survey 3, and a subsequent report elaborating on the findings published in November 1997, entitled Literacy Skills For The Knowledge Society: Further Results from the International Adult Literacy Survey. Several countries have published National Reports as well ¾ the respective National study managers as outlined in the introduction should be contacted for additional details.

This User guide summarizes the survey concepts and operations of the international survey. It is important for users to become familiar with the contents of this document before publishing or otherwise releasing any estimates derived from the IALS microdata file.

 

URL: http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/ cstdli/ ials/1996/ials96gid1.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; OECD Countries; Canada; Literacy; Adult Education; Functional Literacy; Immigrants Education Canada; Literacy Canada; Economic Aspects; Wages Effect of Education; Educational Policy.

 

116. Statistics Canada. (1996). International adult literacy survey. 1994-1996. Questionnaire. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, National Literacy Secretariat & Human Resources Development Canada.

 

            Statistics Canada conducted a national literacy survey in cooperation with the Department of Human Resources Development and the National Literacy Secretariat. Results from the survey will be used to plan programs suited to the needs of Canadians. It will also be used to compare Canadian needs with those of other countries who are conducting a similar study.

 

URL:http://prod.library.utoronto.ca/datalib/codebooks/ cstdli/ ials/1996/canada_ englishque1.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; OECD Countries; Canada; Literacy; Adult Education; Functional Literacy; Immigrants Education Canada; Literacy Canada; Economic Aspects; Wages Effect of Education; Educational Policy.

 

117. Barr-Telford, Lynn, Smith, K., Williams, T., & Kastberg, D. (2000). Adult literacy and lifeskills survey (ALL): Background questionnaire content. Ottawa: NCES, OECD, and Statistics Canada.

 

            The Adult Literacy and Lifeskills Survey (formerly known as the International Lifeskills Survey (ILSS)) is a large-scale, comparative survey that goes beyond previous international studies. In addition to the literacy skills measured in the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), ALL is designed to identify and measure a broader range of skills in the adult population (age 16-65) in each participating country. The skills to be directly measured are: prose and document literacy, numeracy, and analytical reasoning. In addition the assessment will be accompanied by the Background Questionnaire, which will collect participant information and indirectly measure two other skill domains as well. Those skills are: teamwork, and ICT literacy. Additional information about the survey is available in the ALL International Planning Report. The Overarching Framework for Understanding and Assessing Lifeskills lays out the theoretical and conceptual foundations for the survey.

 

URL: http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/all/

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; OECD Countries; Canada; Literacy; Adult Education; Functional Literacy; Immigrants Education Canada; Literacy Canada; Economic Aspects; Wages Effect of Education; Educational Policy.

 

 

118. Statistics Canada. (2003). International adult literacy and skills survey (IALSS). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) is the Canadian component of the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL). The main purpose of the survey was to find out how well adults used printed information to function in society. Survey data include background information (demographic, education, language, labour force, training, literacy uses, information and communication technology, income) and psychometric results of respondents' proficiency along four skill domains: prose and document literacy, numeracy and problem-solving.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=get Survey&

SDDS= 4406& lang=en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; OECD Countries; Canada; Literacy; Adult Education; Functional Literacy; Immigrants Education Canada; Literacy Canada; Economic Aspects; Wages Effect of Education; Educational Policy.

 

 

119. Statistics Canada. (2003). International adult literacy and skills survey (IALSS). Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

The 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) is the Canadian component of the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL). The main purpose of the survey was to find out how well adults used printed information to function in society. Survey data include background information (demographic, education, language, labour force, training, literacy uses, information and communication technology, income) and psychometric results of respondents' proficiency along four skill domains: prose and document literacy, numeracy and problem-solving.

The International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey was a seven-country initiative conducted in 2003. In every country nationally representative samples of adults aged 16-65 were interviewed and tested at home, using the same psychometric test to measure prose and document literacy as well as numeracy and problem-solving skills. In Canada, the survey population was expanded to provide information on respondents over the age of 65. The main purpose of the survey was to find out how well adults used printed information to function in society. Another aim was to collect data on the incidence and volume of participation in adult education and training, and to investigate the relationships between initial and adult education, on the one hand, and literacy, numeracy and problem-solving proficiency and wider economic and social outcomes, on the other. In addition, a subsidiary goal was to provide information regarding change in the distribution of skills over the years since the previous survey (the 1994, International Adult Literacy Survey - to access the 1994 IALS metadata, please use the "Other reference periods" link in the sidebar above). The link between the two measures was made by using items from the 1994 study in the design of the 2003 study.

Users of the data include federal and provincial governments, academics, literacy and skills development professionals, media and interested members of the public. The data are used to inform policy decisions, help effectively allocate resources where needed and inform decisions on the composition and content of remedial skill development course and adult education.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/cgi-bin/imdb/p2SV.pl? Function=get Survey&SDDS=4406& lang=en&db=IMDB&dbg=f&adm=8&dis=2

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; OECD Countries; Canada; Literacy; Adult Education; Functional Literacy; Immigrants Education Canada; Literacy Canada; Economic Aspects; Wages Effect of Education; Educational Policy.

 

120. Lowe, G. S., & McAuley, J. (2000). Adult literacy and lifeskills survey. Information and communication technology literacy assessment framework. Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Canadian Policy Research Networks and University of Alberta.

 

            The purpose of this document is to briefly outline a conceptual framework and question content for an information and communication technology (ICT) literacy module for the ALLS. Because both the framework and the measures have been developed through consultation with various ALLS research team members, content area experts, and National Project Managers, this process is also described. Based on a selective yet illustrative review of relevant literature, the paper provides a rationale for the need to include such a module within an international context and the factors that may influence ICT literacy skills of potential respondents.

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; OECD Countries; Canada; Literacy; Adult Education; Functional Literacy; Immigrants Education Canada; Literacy Canada; Economic Aspects; Wages Effect of Education; Educational Policy.

 

 

121. Murray, T. S., Clermont, Y., & Binkley, M. (2005). International adult literacy survey: Measuring adult literacy and life skills: New frameworks for assessment. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            The objective of this report is to document key aspects of the development of the International Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) – its theoretical roots, the domains selected for possible assessment, the approaches taken to assessment in each domain and the criteria that were employed to decide which domains were to be carried in the final design. As conceived, the ALL survey was meant to build on the success of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) assessments by extending the range of skills assessed and by improving the quality of the assessment methods employed. This report documents several successes including:

  • the development of a new framework and associated robust measures for problem solving

  • the development of a powerful numeracy framework and associated robust measures

  • the specification of frameworks for practical cognition, teamwork and information and communication technology literacy.

The report also provides insight into those domains where development failed to yield approaches to assessment of sufficient quality, insight that reminds us that scientific advance in this domain hard won (From Foreword).

 

URL: http://www.nald.ca/fulltext/measlit/intro.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; OECD Countries; Canada; Literacy; Adult Education; Functional Literacy; Immigrants Education Canada; Literacy Canada; Economic Aspects; Wages Effect of Education; Educational Policy.

 

122. Statistics Canada. (1998). International adult literacy survey. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

 

            In recent years, adult literacy has come to be seen as crucial to the economic performance of industrialized nations. Literacy is no longer defined merely in terms of a basic threshold of reading ability, mastered by almost all those growing up in developed countries. Rather, literacy is now seen as how adults use written information to function in society. Today, adults need a higher level of literacy to function well: society has become more complex and low-skill jobs are disappearing. Therefore, inadequate levels of literacy among a broad section of the population potentially threaten the strength of economies and the social cohesion of nations. With these high stakes, governments have a growing interest in understanding the level and distribution of literacy among their adult populations, and what can be done to improve them. The result was The International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS). The IALS was a collaborative effort by seven governments and three intergovernmental organizations. The countries of Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, Switzerland and the United States participated in the IALS.

The Canadian IALS survey had a number of objectives. These were: a) to provide an updated profile of adult literacy abilities for Canada for comparison to that provided by the 1989 Survey of Literacy Skills Used in Daily Activities (LSUDA); b) to provide sufficiently large numbers of Franco-Ontarians, seniors, social assistance recipients, unemployment insurance recipients and out-of-school youth to profile their skill levels; c) to shed light on the relationship between performance, educational attainment, labour market participation and employment for those at certain literacy levels; and d) to compare Canadian literacy levels with those in other countries. The results of the survey shed light on the social and economic impacts of different levels of literacy, the underlying factors which cause them and how they might be amenable to policy intervention.

 

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/ials/1998/ guide-e.pdf

URL: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Dli/Metadata/ials/1996/ ials96gid1.pdf

 

            KEY WORDS: Educational Surveys; OECD Countries; Canada; Literacy; Adult Education; Functional Literacy; Immigrants Education Canada; Literacy Canada; Economic Aspects; Wages Effect of Education; Educational Policy.

 

123. International Social Survey Programme (ISSP). (2007). History of the ISSP Retrieved November 30, 2006 from http://www.issp.org/beginning.shtml


The International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) is a continuing annual programme of cross-national collaboration on surveys covering topics important for social science research. It brings together pre-existing national social science projects and co-ordinates research goals, thereby adding a cross-national, cross-cultural perspective to the individual, national studies. Formed in 1983, the group develops topical modules dealing with important areas of social science as supplements to regular national surveys. Every survey includes questions about general attitudes toward various social issues such as the legal system, sex, and the economy. Special topics have included the environment, the role of government, social inequality, social support, family and gender issues, work orientation, the impact of religious background, behaviour, and beliefs on social and political preferences, and national identity. Participating countries vary for each topical module. The methods used for obtaining this information include an interview and/or self-completing questionnaire.
 

URL: http://www.gesis.org/en/data_service/issp/

URL: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/09784.xml

 

KEY WORDS: Attitudes; Employment; Job Satisfaction; Job Security; Job Stress; Leisure; Public Opinion; Technological Change; Wages and Salaries; Work; Work Attitudes; Work Environment; Working Hours; Child Care; Domestic Responsibilities; Families; Family Life; Family Structure; Gender; Gender Roles; Housework; Marriage; Public Opinion; Working Mothers; Working Women.

 

 

 

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